Valid CSS3!

Infodoc HTML Post-processing

Table of Contents

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Infodoc HTML Styling Package

Infodoc CSS styles and HTML post-processor documentation.
This document describes version 0.0.07 of ’infodoc-styles.css’
and version 0.0.04 of ’idpp’.

This document is also a Texinfo Source Template used for testing the conversion of ’texi’ source to HTML output.

Because this is a test document and may produce some odd output at times: for ’info’ output, please open your terminal window to at least 132 columns and for HTML output, open your browser to full-screen mode.






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Overview

Why Are We Doing This Project?

"I know it’s only documentation, but I like it, like it, yes I do.
Mick Jagger and Keith Richards (with Ronnie Wood)

User-oriented documentation is the public face of any product, and serves as the primary contract between developer and customer. Documentation reflects the professionalism and reliability (or lack thereof) of the developer. Thus, when a developer creates documentation, he or she expects it to be of highest quality; and in our experience, the better the documentation is, the better the product will be.

The Texinfo ’makeinfo’ documentation system (along with TeX) is the official documentation engine for GNU/Linux, its utilities and applications. ’makeinfo’ is a great tool, but because it must serve a broad range of user needs, it is necessarily limited both in flexibility and in professional polish. This Infodoc package provides a tool for beautifying the documentation produced by the texi-to-HTML converter.



Infodoc Package Components

’infodoc-styles.css’ is a Cascading Style Sheet (CSS) definition file. This file may be applied to the raw HTML output generated by the Texinfo ’makeinfo’ utility to correct and beautify the raw HTML document.
See CSS Definition File, (version: 0.0.07)

’idpp’ Infodoc Post Processor is a small, console utility written in C++. ’idpp’ automatically applies the CSS style definitions of ’infodoc-styles.css’ as well as correcting the more outstanding errors and formatting weaknesses found in the raw HTML generated by the ’makeinfo’ documentation engine.
See Infodoc Post-processor, (version: 0.0.04)

’infodoc.texi’ is the Texinfo source code for the Infodoc package documentation for both ’infodoc-styles.css’ and ’idpp’. Build the documentation files using the standard ’make’/’gmake’ utility and the provided ’Makefile’. (Pre-built copies are included in the package.)
See Rebuilding the info and HTML documents.

This document also includes a comprehensive test suite which exercises all the major functionality of ’makeinfo’ which is likely to affect the quality of the HTML output, documenting its capabilities as well as its shortcommings. The test suite focues on the info-format and the HTML-format documents generated simultaneously from the ’texi’ source. Special attention is given to the similarities AND differences between the two document formats.
See Makeinfo Testing.



The ’makeinfo’ Texi-to-HTML Converter and Why It Needs Our Help

The makeinfo utility creates HTML output when invoked with the --html option. This generates references to a large number of CSS class names; however, these classes, if defined at all, are really just stubs which need to be defined in a more meaningful way to create professional-looking HTML output.

The raw HTML output relies on browser defaults to handle the missing or incompletely-defined classes. Considering the wide variety of browsers, HTML syntax versions and rendering standards currently in use, this is a reasonable default process; however, we find it to be a bit too Wild-West for our taste.

To customize the HTML output, it is necessary to robustly define the named classes referenced in the HTML output. This is not entirely straightforward because classes are often embedded within other classes, inheriting from, or overriding definitions of the parent class.

The makeinfo texi-to-HTML converter also suffers from a number of bugs and logical inconsistencies for which the CSS definitions in conjunction with the ’idpp’ post-processor attempts to compensate.




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CSS Definition File

The CSS definition file, ’infodoc-styles.css’ robustly defines all the CSS class definitions called out in the HTML documents generated by the Texinfo texi-to-HTML converter. Many other class definitions and HTML tag re-definitions are also provided to rescue your lovingly-crafted documents from the often ugly, and sometimes barely-readable rendering inflicted on your document by the browser’s default settings.

The styled HTML has been functionally verified by the the test suite included in this document. The page rendering has been visually and aesthetically verified for use with reasonably up-to-date versions of Firefox(tm), Chrome(tm) and Opera(tm) browsers. (Note that Internet Explorer(tm) version 11 and higher renders sloppy, but readable formatting, although in our opinion, only a fool would use IE.)




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Summary of CSS Definitions

The CSS definitions in ’infodoc-styles.css’ fall into the following broad categories.

  1. Whole-document (<body>) Definitions
  2. CSS Class Definitions
  3. Sub-class Tag Definitions
  4. Redefinition of Inadequate or Deprecated HTML Tags


Basic Document Style

Every HTML document needs certain style definitions. Often, the browser’s default definition for an object is quite acceptable. At other times, the various browsers can’t agree on how to render an object, so it may look great in one browser/version and nasty in another browser/version. Your customer will immediately assume that this is your fault. Applying CSS style gives you greater control over how our document will be displayed to the user.

The following table shows the ’infodoc-styles.css’ style definitions which apply to the entire document.
Please see (see Adjusting Style Definitions) for a detailed description of each of these style elements.

FUNCTIONHTML/CSS OBJECTSTYLE ELEMENT
 Background Color <body>background-color:
 Text Color <body>color:
 Font Size <body>font-size:
 Font Family <body>font-family:
 Container Width ’infodoc_container’ classmax-width:, padding-right:, padding-left:


Matching Your Texinfo Commands to CSS Definitions

This table describes the relationship between your ’.texi’ source code commands and the HTML output generated from them when using the makeinfo texi-to-HTML converter.

TEXINFO COMMANDHTML OBJECTEXAMPLES AND TESTS
 ♦♦♦ Block Environments ♦♦♦
 @quotation’quotation’ class, <blockquote> tagsee Quotation Commands
 @smallquotation’smallquotation’ class
 @indentedblock’indentedblock’ classsee Indentedblock Commands
 @smallindentedblock’smallindentedblock’ class
 @example’example’ class, ’example.pre’ classsee Example Commands
 @smallexample’smallexample’ class,
’smallexample.pre’ class
 @lisp’lisp’ class,
’lisp.pre’ class
see Example Commands
 @smalllisp’smalllisp’ class,
’smalllisp.pre’ class
 @display’display’ class, ’display.pre’ classsee Display Commands
 @smalldisplay’smalldisplay’ class,
’smalldisplay.pre’ class
 @format’format’ class, ’format.pre’ classsee Format Commands
 @smallformat’smallformat’ class,
’smallformat.pre’ class
 @verbatim<pre> tag,
’pre.verbatim’ class
see Verbatim Command

 
 ♦♦♦ Block Modifiers ♦♦♦
 @flushleft<p align="left">see Misc Block Modifiers
 @flushright<p align="right">
 @raggedright(not supported in HTML)
 @cartouche’table.cartouche’ class
 @allowcodebreaks’nocodebreak’ class
 @w{}’nolinebreak’ class, ’&nbsp’
 @exdent
 
 ♦♦♦ Lists ♦♦♦
 @itemize’no-bullet’ class
’disc-bullet’ class
’circle-bullet’ class
’square-bullet’ class
’custom-bullet’ class
see Itemized Lists
 @enumerate’enum-decimal’ class
’enum-decimal-zero’ class
’enum-lower-alpha’ class
’enum-upper-alpha’ class
’enum-lower-roman’ class
’enum-upper-roman’ class
’enum-lower-greek’ class
’enum-custom’ class
see Enumerated Lists
 
 ♦♦♦ Tables ♦♦♦
 @multitable<table> tag, plus <thead>, <th>,
<tr>, <td>, ’table.bordered’ class
and its subclasses
see Table and Multitable
 @table<dl> tag, plus <dl>, <dt>, <dd>
 
 ♦♦♦ Font Modifiers ♦♦♦
 @sc (smallcaps)<small> tagsee Font Modification
 @emph (emphasis)<em> tag
 @strong<strong> tag
 @b (bold)<b> tag
 @i (italic)<i> tag
 @r (roman)’roman’ class
 @t (typewriter)<tt> tag (redefined)
 @sansserif’sansserif’ class
 @slanted<i> tag
 
 ♦♦♦ Object Indicators ♦♦♦
 @code<code> tagsee Object Indicators
 @samp<samp> tag
 @var<var> tag
 @cite<cite> tag
 @abbr<abbr> tag
 @kbd<kbd> tag,
’kbd’ class(discarded)
 @env<code> tag
 @file<samp> tag
 @command<code> tag
 @option<samp> tag
 @dfn<em> tag
 @verb<tt> tag
 @key<tt> tag,
’key’ class(discarded)
 @acronyn<acronym> tag (redefined)
 @indicateurl<p> tag
 @url<a href="xxxx">
 @email<a href="mailto:xxxx">
 
 ♦♦♦ Headings ♦♦♦
 Document Title<h1> tag (redefined)
 Chapter Titles<h2> tag (redefined)
 @section<h3> tagsee Basic Tests
 @heading<h3> tag
 @subsection<h4> tag
 @subheading<h4> tag
 @subsubsection’h4.subsubsection’ class
 @subsubheading’h4.subsubheading’ class
 Level-5 Heading<h5> tag
redefined, but not used
by texi-to-HTML converter
 
 ♦♦♦ Miscellaneous ♦♦♦
Table of Contents’contents’ classsee InfoTOC Structure
 Texinfo Menus’menu’ class plussee InfoMenu Structure
 Index’index-cp’ class,
’jumpto’ class
see Index Notes
 Paragraph Text<p> tag (redefined)
Note that each block
environment defines
it own <p> tag.
see Basic Tests


Normally, it is not necessary to worry about the exact HTML/CSS construct being generated for a given sequence of source commands because the post-processor is designed to handle it transparently; however, if a problem arises, then the table above will help you to find the offending sequence.

Please note that this list is not exhaustive. Many Texinfo commands which have little or no effect on the HTML output are not listed. However, we have carefully documented all the Texinfo constructs which the texi-to-HTML converter references and/or which have a significant effect on documents in HTML format.

Some Texinfo HTML-only commands, variables and build options are not considered here. Instead we rely on the defaults for these modifiers in order to simplify testing. Some examples of these are: ’DOCTYPE’, ’BODYTEXT’, ’TEXI2HTML’, ’simple_menu’, the variables listed in Texinfo Chapter 22.5.3, ’HTML Customization Variables’, and others. If you find that ’idpp’ has trouble handling documents that uses these modifiers, please send us a note describing the problem (see Technical Support).




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Applying the CSS Definitions

Applying the CSS definitions in ’infodoc-styles.css’ to your HTML document can be done using the ’idpp’ Infodoc Post Processor, or may be done by manually editing your HTML document. We recommend using ’idpp’ to style your documents. Not only will it save time and effort, it will help to avoid introducing markup errors. Any additional manual processing may then be done after the CSS styles have been applied. For instructions on both automatic and manual application of CSS style, please refer to the chapter on post-processing your HTML documentation:
See HTML Post-processing. .

Painless CSS Style

If you are having issues converting your own ’texi’ source documents to an acceptable HTML format, or if you are having to perform significant post-processing on the HTML to get the desired appearance, then we believe that the CSS styles defined in ’infodoc-styles.css’ may ease your burden.

It is hoped that the application of these styles:

  a) will create better consistency across object blocks
  b) will provide firmer control over the generated HTML output, and
  c) will give you the flexibility customize the output for your needs.



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Adjusting Style Definitions

The CSS style definition file ’infodoc-styles.css’ contains a large number of style definitions for the various constructs that may be generated by the Texinfo texi-to-HTML converter. Please feel free to experiment with these definitions to find out what CSS can do for you.

Important Note:
         Always make a backup copy of the definition file 
             in case you decide to undo your changes.

Whole-document Definitions

The CSS definitions which apply to the whole document are located near the top of the file inside the definition of the <body> tag.



Adjusting Individual Styles

If a particular block or other construct in the HTML document is not being displayed as you would like, then you can adjust the definition associated with its HTML tag or CSS class definition. These modifications will require at least a basic understanding of CSS syntax and the style elements and values available for the target construct.

To match the visual display to its styling, open the HTML document for editing and search for the displayed text. Note the environment(s) within which the text lives (paragraph, div, class, span, etc.), then find its definition in the ’infodoc-styles.css’ definition file.

Example: 
The HTML mark-up for THIS paragraph looks like the following:
<div class="example"><pre class="example"> ... </pre></div>

To modify the definition for this paragraph, open 'infodoc-styles.css' 
and go to the definition for the '.example' class, which will look 
something like this:
.example
{
  font-family: monospace;
  font-size: inherit;
  font-style: inherit;
  font-weight: inherit;
  color: inherit;
  white-space: pre;
  margin-left: 3.2em;
}
.example pre
{
  font-family: inherit;
  font-size: inherit;
  font-style: inherit;
  font-weight: inherit;
  color: inherit;
  white-space: inherit;
  margin-left: 0;
}

For a smooth introduction to CSS please visit the Mozilla Developer Network which is maintained by the Mozilla Project:
https://developer.mozilla.org/en-US/docs/Web/CSS/Reference


Use care when adjusting individual style definitions because inheritance of style elements is an important issues in HTML documents generated from Texinfo source data. Any changes you make may affect more than just the bit of text you’re viewing at the moment.

In summary, have fun! The worst you can do is to bend an electron too far and cause worldwide nuclear annihilation. :-)




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HTML Post-processing

Automatic post-processing can be performed on your HTML documents using the ’idpp’ Infodoc Post Processor utility. For the tweakers in the crowd, the steps performed by ’idpp’ may also be performed manually




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Infodoc Post-processor

Automatically perform post-processing on HTML documents generated from Texinfo source. We hope that this simple utility will help you to create professionally styled HTML documentation for your project. Enjoy!
Software Sam




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Post-processor Overview

The Infodoc Post-processor automatically applies CSS style to the raw HTML generated by the ’makeinfo’ utility. If you write HTML documentation using Texinfo, but don’t have time to learn HTML markup and CSS style, then this post-processing utility is for you.



What the Post-processor Does

This section describes the modifications made to the source document if no process-modification switches are specified on the command line.
See see Invoking idpp for information on command-line switches.

For a more detailed explanation of the changes made, please refer to the chapter on making manual modifications to the source document. The automatic modifications closely mirror the descriptions in
see Manual Post-processing.



What the Post-processor Assumes

This is a very simple application. We have tried to avoid the usual sources of embarrassment that arise from software developers making assumptions about what users may do with the application; however, you should be aware of the assumptions we have made about the HTML source documents:

  1. First, ’idpp’ verifies the contents of ’infodoc-styles.css’, the CSS definition file by checking the copyright message and the version number. Beyond that, ’idpp’ relies on the definitions in ’infodoc-styles.css’ to be intact. If you have modified these definitions, ’idpp’ has no way of knowing about it, so use care.
  2. It is assumed that the source document is UTF-8 encoded.
  3. It is assumed that the terminal environment has indicated the correct (UTF-8 aware) locale (language-specific processing) for the data being processed.
    Note: To determine the locale used by your terminal, enter the ’locale’ command.
  4. It is assumed that the lines of the source document are of reasonable length, Any more than approximately 3000 bytes of UTF-8 data per line might be considered unreasonable.
  5. Source document lines may end with either a linefeed or a CRLF (0x0D, 0x0A) sequence; however, lines of target documents will be terminated with a linefeed (0x0A) only.
  6. Lists embedded within block constructs and Blocks embedded within other blocks.

    Lists (@itemize and @enumerate) created inside an @indentedblock or @smallindentedblock environment are accurately identified and processed. Example: see Lists Inside Blocks.

    However, it is recommended that lists should not be embedded inside preformatted blocks (@display, @format, @example, @lisp, and their ’small’ equivalents). The HTML markup generated by the texi-to-HTML converter in these blocks can become quite tortured and difficult to parse. For this reason, ’idpp’ does not scan the contents of preformatted blocks, but merely copies the block contents unmodified from source to target.

    Also, Texinfo allows for blocks nested within blocks to the limit of the margins. It is recommended, however, that nested blocks be used cautiously if the document is to be converted to HTML.
    See Blocks Inside Blocks.

  7. It is assumed that there may be hand-crafted HTML markup inside a @html ... @end html sequence in your ’.texi’ source document; however, there is no way for ’idpp’ to know whether it is embedded or auto-generated data. Please refer to the HTML markup embedded directly into the ’.texi’ source of this document. Although for test purposes, much of this embedded HTML is intentionally similar to the auto-generated code, ’idpp’ passes all of it through unmodified. For example, we can say with some confidence that your lovingly-crafted HTML will never look as nasty as this:
    (see embedded HTML example).

    Still, it is possible that your embedded HTML may cause the output-line counter to be off a bit or in rare cases you may see that ’idpp’ has attempted to reformat your embedded HTML code, so you should visually confirm any HTML which you have embedded directly into the texi source.

  8. It is assumed that the user is not a Bozo.
    1. In other words, it is expected that the source document was actually generated by the Texinfo ’makeinfo’ utility using the ’--html’ switch, and optionally, the ’--no-split’ switch.
      Example:
      makeinfo --html --no-split yourdoc.texi
      

      The formatting of HTML documents created by the texi-to-HTML converter is very specific. Post-processing an HTML document created by other means will yield wildly unpredictable results.

    2. Any manual modifications to the document should be performed AFTER the post-processor has been run.
    3. It is recommended that all post-processing of the document be done in a single pass.
      - If you accidentally run ’idpp’ a second time on the same document 
        using the same command-line switches, it SHOULD create an  
        identical copy of the document, but this is not guaranteed. 
      - If you run ’idpp’ a second time on the same document using 
        DIFFERENT command-line switches, the output of the second pass 
        will PROBABLY be what you expect, but again, this cannot be 
        guaranteed.
      



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Text Mode

When invoked in Text Mode, ’idpp’ is a standard GNU/Linux console utility with all user interaction occuring through the console I/O streams ’wcout’ and ’wcin’ (stdin/stdout in C-language terms). Input may come from from the keyboard or from a re-directed response file. Output may be redirected to a UTF-8 text file if desired.

With few exceptions, after initial invocation, Text Mode processing occurs without user intervention. Processing is quite fast. For instance, the HTML-formatted documentation for this package contains approximately 5,500 lines of HTML markup code which on a relatively ordinary system is processed in less than two (2) seconds excluding the time spent waiting for user decisions.

Please see a detailed description of the available processing options in the chapter see Invoking idpp.


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Interactive Mode

The dialog-based user interface for ’idpp’ is not yet implemented.

If there is user demand for Interactive Mode processing, the author will implement it in a later release.

The idea behind a dialog-based user interface is to provide clearer feedback on the processing being done AND to provide the user with finer control over the processing options.

The most useful functions of an interactive post-processor will be to overcome Texinfo shortcommings regarding HTML lists, to format tables and to allow the user to adjust line spacing in the HTML output.

Additionally, Interactive Mode would allow convenient adjustment of the whole-document options in the CSS style-definition file:
1) background color
2) base text color
3) base font size
4) font family
5) container dimensions

For more information, see Adjusting Style Definitions.




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Invoking idpp

This chapter describes the processing options available as command-line switches.

Please refer also to the next chapter, which describes the logic behind the ’idpp’ user interface. See Interface Logic.



Processing Options

Usage  :
idpp [OPTIONS][HTML_FILENAMES]      

Example:
idpp -to --no_meta home.htm


Specifying Source Documents

Specify between one (1) and 24 HTML source documents to be processed.

Specify the documents by their filename only, not by a path/filename. The path is assumed to be the current working directory (or the specified target directory: '-d' option).

Example:
idpp -t MyNovel.html mnChapter01.html mnChapter02.html mnChapter03.html

Before processing begins, all specified documents are validated as HTML markup. Please see Interface Logic for details on source-document validation. If any document fails the validation process, then no documents will be processed.

Documents will be processed in the order in which they are specified. Please also see the -a option below.



Specifying Options

–t Start the application in text-only mode.

Text Mode is the application default. If no processing mode is specified, then Text Mode is assumed.
See Text Mode, for a description of the Text Mode interface.


–i Start the application in Interactive Mode.

Interactive Mode is not currently implemented.
See Interactive Mode.


–v Verbose output, report details of each operation.

Verbose output is useful if idpp is encountering a parsing error or other problem because it will show the approximate line number at which the error occurred. And if you have OCD, verbose output will give you comfort.


–a Process all source files in target directory.

Process everything in the target directory that look like HTML.

Scans the current working directory (or specified target directory) for HTML documents, adding each valid HTML document found to the list of files to be processed, up to a maximum of 24 files.

In order to avoid filename duplication, any source-document filenames specified directly on the command line will be discarded before the directory scan begins.

Files are initially identified by their filename extensions. The recognized filename extensions are:
’html’  ’htm’  ’shtml’  ’shtm’  ’xhtml’

Each identified file is then validated according to the criteria described above.


–o Ordered-lists: specifiy an enumeration type.

           ♦ Interactive Command ♦

Application prompts for a decision on each <ol> list.

Because Texinfo/makeinfo incompletely implements ordered lists in HTML-formatted documents, some of your original data may have been lost; specifically, the enumeration type and the sequence start point. This option (and the ’-p’ option below) allow you to interactively specify these lost parameters.

Example Prompt:
____________________________
Enumerated List: Line: 340
First Line Item: <li> Buying your first car<br>
Choose Enumeration type (decimal is the default)
d:decimal          D:leading-zero decimal
a:lower case alpha A:upper case alpha
r:lower case Roman R:upper case Roman
g:lower case Greek c:custom enumeration
your choice: _

The prompt shown above indicates the line number of the source file at which the <ol> list was found and as a reference, also displays the first line of the first item of the list.

Your response should be a single character selected from the options provided, followed by the ’ENTER’ key. If you enter an invalid response, you will be re-prompted until you select a valid response, or until you hit the Panic Button (CTRL+C)

[’default_token’ response == ’d’ (see response file)]


–p Ordered Lists: prompt for sequence offset.

           ♦ Interactive Command ♦

By default each ordered-sequence list begins at the top of the sequence (1, A, a, etc.) without prompting for a value. While this is the correct behavior in most cases, your source document may contain a list that is broken into sections. Use this option to ensure that each section of your list begins with the desired sequence number.

Note that by specifying this option you are also implicity selecting the ’-o’ option above.

Example Prompt:
____________________________
Enumerated List: Line: 340
First Line Item: <li> Buying your first car<br>
Choose Enumeration type (decimal is the default)
d:decimal          D:leading-zero decimal
a:lower case alpha A:upper case alpha
r:lower case Roman R:upper case Roman
g:lower case Greek c:custom enumeration
your choice: A
Sequence start(1-n): _

Your response should be a decimal numeric value of one (1) or greater, followed by the ’ENTER’ key.

For example, if you have an list whose items are ordered by lower-case alpha, and you want the sequence to begin at the letter ’e’, you would respond to the prompt with the decimal value ’5’ i.e. the 5th letter of the alphabet.

If you enter a non-numeric value or a value less than zero, you will be re-prompted until you enter a valid number, or until you hit the Panic Button (CTRL+C).

[’default_token’ response == ’1’ (see response file)]


–d Specify an alternate target directory.

By default, all source files specified for processing as well as the CSS definition reference file are assumed to be located in the current working directory (CWD).

Use this option to specify a different directory in which to look for the source files and the CSS definition file.

All processed HTML target files will also be written to the specified directory.

Examples:
idpp -dpublic_html
idpp -d ../../src_dir
idpp -d=/home/Sam/Documents/htm_dir

–f Specify an alternate CSS definition file.

Specify the filename of the CSS definition file to use for applying style to the HTML document(s).

By default, ’idpp’ looks for the file ’infodoc-styles.css’ in the current working directory (or the working directory specified by the ’-d’ option). If you have a customized CSS definition file with a different name or location, you can specify it here. Please specify either a filename ONLY, or a relative path/filename specification with no aliases.

Because the path/filename you specify with this option is written directly into the HTML document, the file must be in the same relative position for both post-processing AND for live rendering by the browser.

Note that an absolute path specification MIGHT work, but experience shows that absolute paths are rather fragile in this context, especially when moving the document from your local development environment to a hosted server.

Examples:
idpp -f my-styles.css  mypage.html
idpp -f='../resources/my-styles.css'  mypage.html
idpp -f=my-styles.css  mypage.html

–c Process the Table of Contents as a list.

Process the document’s Table of Contents as a multi-level unordered list. This option converts the Table of Contents from a simple list of chapter links into a multi-level bulleted list.

(Our art consultant says it looks better this way, but of course this a subjective decision.)

Note that this option will apply only to a Table of Contents which is located before all chapter nodes and sectioning.

Note also that the ’−c’ option is incompatible with the ’−r’ option, below. If both are specified, then the ’−r’ option takes precedence.

By default, the Table of Contents is unmodified. For more information on how the Table of Contents is constructed, please
see InfoTOC Structure.


–r Remove the Table of Contents from the document.

Because Texinfo documents are based on a system of chapter headers and menus, you may find that having a Table of Contents seems rather useless. If so, you can use this option to remove the entire Table of Contents without breaking the intra-document links.

Note that this option will apply only to a Table of Contents which is located before all chapter nodes and sectioning.
See also the Texinfo '@contents' command.

By default, the Table of Contents is unmodified. For more information on how the Table of Contents is constructed, please
see InfoTOC Structure.


––up_target Specify parent document path.

Use this option to specify the path to the parent document represented by the top node’s "Up" hyperlink. This will usually be a relative path which steps up one level in the document tree.

The displayed text representing the hyperlink is also modified. By default, the displayed text will be set to ’(top)’; however, you may optionally specify the text which will be displayed.

To specify the display text, append the new display text to your argument string separated by a comma (’,’) as shown in the example.

Example (default display text):
idpp --up_target='../parent_node.htm'

yields:
... Up: <a href="../parent_node.htm" accesskey="u" rel="up">(top)</a>...

Example (specify display text):
idpp --up_target='../parent_node.htm,(mama)'

yields:
... Up: <a href="../parent_node.htm" accesskey="u" rel="up">(mama)</a>...

If your document is a stand-alone document, or if it is the top node on a document tree, then the auto-generated "Up" hyperlink at the top of the document will probably be pointing to an invalid target by default (but see the Texinfo customization variable, ’TOP_NODE_UP_URL’).

If the user clicks on this invalid hyperlink, the browser will display a message that the target was not found. This would be confusing for the user and embarrassing for you, the designer. For this reason, ’idpp’, by default, points this hyperlink to the top of the current page (but see the '--no_uplink' option below).

Note that for info-format documents, this default "Up" link would be used to link the document into the top node of the ’info’ document tree, but this is usually not applicable to the top of an HTML document tree.


––table_border Add a border/grid around the elements of a table.

           ♦ Interactive Command ♦

Draw tables in the HTML document using a grid between elements and a border around the entire table.

In hand-crafted HTML documents, table objects are usually constructed with borders, and other style elements. However, an HTML-format table generated from a Texinfo source document is rather plain and featureless at best. To beautify these tables, use the --table_border option to draw the elements of the table with borders.

The --table_border option has two (2) sub-options.

Examples:
./idpp --table_border  mypage.html
./idpp --table_border=all  mypage.html
./idpp --table_border=specify  mypage.html

If invoked with the sub-option, 'specify', then for each table found in the source document, you will be asked whether to draw a border around the table.

The following examples are simple tables created using the Texinfo @multitable command. In the HTML-format document, ’infodoc_css.html’ (with CSS style applied), the first instance is drawn without a border, and the second instance is drawn with a border.

HEADING AHEADING BHEADING C
row 1, column ’a’row 1, column ’b’row 1, column ’c’
row 2, column ’a’row 2, column ’b’row 2, column ’c’
row 3, column ’a’row 3, column ’b’row 3, column ’c’

HEADING AHEADING BHEADING C
row 1-a, borderedrow 1-b, borderedrow 1-c, bordered
row 2-a, borderedrow 2-b, borderedrow 2-c, bordered
row 3-a, borderedrow 3-b, borderedrow 3-c, bordered


This is the prompt which asks whether you want this table to have a border.

Example Prompt:
____________________________
Table found on Line:1350
First Row: <thead><tr><th>HEADING A</th>. . .
Add border to this table?
your choice (y/n): _

The prompt shown above indicates the line number of the source file at which the <table> tag was found and as a reference, also displays the data of the first column of the first row of the table.

Note that for this example, the first row of the table is a heading row, but if your table has no column headings, then the first data row will be displayed.

Your response should be either a ’y’ or an ’n’, followed by the ’ENTER’ key. If you enter an invalid response, you will be re-prompted until you select a valid response, or until you hit the Panic Button (CTRL+C).

[’default_token’ response == ’n’ (see response file)]


––my_metadata Insert custom metadata elements.

The texi-to-HTML converter inserts some (rather useless) metadata elements, links and other data into the '<head>...</head>' block. By default, ’idpp’ discards all this questionable data (but see the '--no_meta' and '--no_links' options below).

Use this option to insert meaningful metadata elements, comments or other data into your document. The contents of the specified file will be copied into the document’s ’<head>’ block, just above the ’</head>’ tag.

Please note that this option is roughly equivalent to the Texinfo ’EXTRA_HEAD’ customization variable, but is much easier to use.
Please see Texinfo HTML Customization Variables.

Specify the (text only) input file as a filename (current directory), OR as a relative or absolute path/filename specification.

Examples:
./idpp --my_metadata=metadata.txt  mypage.html
./idpp --my_metadata='../../extra/metadata.htm'  mypage.html
./idpp --my_metadata='/home/Sam/Documents/metadata.txt'  mypage.html

Note that the contents of the specified file are copied to the target document without validation of any kind, so be sure it is valid HTML markup and that it behaves as intended.

It is strongly recommended that you not insert CSS style elements in this way because they will interfere with, or override the definitions in the ’infodoc-styles.css’ CSS definition file. To modify the CSS definitions, edit the ’infodoc-styles.css’ file directly.


––css_mods Interactively modify the CSS definition file.

** NOT YET IMPLEMENTED *
Until this option is implemented, you may manually edit the CSS definition file to adjust these parameters.
(See Adjusting Style Definitions.)

 -   -   -   -   -   -   -   -   -   -

Interactively edit specific CSS definitions in the ’infodoc-styles.css’ definition file, or the specified alternate CSS file.

Examples:
./idpp --css_mods
./idpp --css_mods -f=infodoc-styles.css
./idpp --css_mods -f=myCSSdefs.css

Note that if this option is specified, then any HTML source files and HTML post-processing options specified on the command line are ignored. Only the '-f=alternate_css_filename.css' option is recognized. (see idpp -f option for details.).

The current values for the following CSS parameters are displayed, and you may specify new values for these parameters as desired.

   ** SCREEN SHOT OF PROMPT HERE **

Note that the original CSS file is not modified. Instead it is renamed according to the file’s modification date and changes are written to a new file using the original filename.

For a more detailed discussion of adjusting the CSS definitions, please see Adjusting Style Definitions.

Selecting foreground and background colors

Because the terminal window is not capable of displaying the colors available to a browser application, only the hexadecimal values for the background and foreground colors are shown, (sorry about that). To select the desired foreground or background color, please visit the author’s website for a demonstration of the so-called web-safe colors available to browser applications. Chart of Web-Safe Colors

Selecting the base font size

The base font size that you choose for your document is based primarily on the screen resolution of the systems on which the document will be displayed. For instance, a 10pt or 12pt point font is clearly visible on a 640x480 pixel display, but is nearly unreadable on a modern 1080p (1920x1080 pixel) display.

The base font size is the size of text displayed in a normal paragraph (like this paragraph) which contains no additional styling. We have chosen our default value (referred to as ’1.0em;’) because it is readily visible to average college-student eyes at 1080p display resolution. The size of all other text in the document is calculated as a percentage of this base size. Thus, if you adjust this base size, all text in the document will be automatically adjusted as well.

As an additional note, if your web content targets an older audience or those with visual disabilities, you may want to increase the font size to compensate for the potentially weaker eyesight of your visitors. If you still get complaints, then your tech support staff should be prepared to explain the universal browser functions: ’CTRL+’ and ’CTRL-’.

Selecting the width of the data container

Because display resolution has a significant impact on display of HTML documents in a browser, the layout you craft so carefully on your development system may be rendered in a significantly different format on other systems. For this reason it is generally a good idea to set a maximum width for display of your document. In this way, you can be confident that the displayed document will be quite similar on a large majority of systems.

Our artistic consultant believes (and we concur) that the width of a document should be limited to a range of 1,000 to 1,600 pixels for maximum readability. We have chosen a conservative value for the default container width, because it is an aesthetic match to the corresponding info-format document, but you should select a value that works for YOU.

Selecting the border style

The data container may optionally be specified with a border. Currently, we are undecided whether the document looks better with, or without a border, and the style of that border is of course a matter of personal preference.

The Infodoc package is distributed with this border invisible; however, please feel free to experiment with the width, style and color to see what works best for you.


––no_mods Do not perform document modifications.

Scan the HTML source document and report the operations that WOULD BE performed when invoking ’idpp’ with the specified options. The source document is not modified, and no target file is generated.

Specifying the '--no_mods' option implies the '-v' (verbose output) option AND bypasses all interactive user prompts.

Use this option to pre-scan a document, to locate a specific object in the document, or to locate potential post-processing problems.

Examples:
./idpp --no_mods  testdoc.html
./idpp -tcov --no_mods  testdoc.html

––no_doctype Do not update the <!DOCTYPE> tag.

The <!DOCTYPE ...>' specification is the first line in an HTML file and specifies the HTML-version criteria that the browser should use in interpreting the document.

Unfortunately, the texi-to-HTML converter specifies the ancient ’HTML4.01 transitional’ version. For this reason, ’idpp’ replaces this with the standard '<!DOCTYPE html>' specifier by default.

However, if your document specifically indicates an HTML version that the browser should use (see the Texinfo ’DOCTYPE’ configuration variable), then use the '--no_doctype' option to preserve the intended doctype data.
Please also see Texinfo Build Options.

Example:
./idpp --no_doctype  mypage.html

For more information, see Post-processing Notes.


––no_meta Do not remove valid metadata.

By default, ’idpp’ removes all of the metadata tags of the form: '<meta name=...' from the <head>...</head> section of the document.

These metadata entries are discussed in detail in the chapter:
see Post-processing Notes. Briefly, however, the default contents of these entries is rather useless, and some of the entries are invalid HTML according to modern standards.

Currently, the HTML specification allows only the metadata names "application-name", "author", "description", "generator", "keywords", (or one of the registered Metadata Extension names). See W3.org for details:
http://www.w3.org/TR/html-markup/meta.name.html

If you have generated meaningful metadata entries, then use the '--no_meta' option to preserve the intended data.

Example:
./idpp --no_meta  mypage.html

See the Texinfo '@documentdescription' command and the customization variable, ’EXTRA_HEAD’
(see Texinfo Invocation Options) for additional details.

Special Note: If you specify the ’makeinfo’ ’DATE_IN_HEADER’ configuration variable during the build, then the --no_meta' option will retain the resulting metadata entry in addition to the metadata entries described above.
Please see Texinfo HTML Customization Variables.

For more information, also see idpp --my_metadata option, above.


––no_links Do not delete <link> elements in <head>.

By default, ’idpp’ removes all of the <link> tags from the <head>...</head> section of the document.

These <link> entries are discussed in detail in the chapter:
see Post-processing Notes. Briefly, however, the default entries tend to be either incorrect or meaningless.

If you have generated meaningful data for these entries, then use the '--no_links' option to preserve the intended data.

Example:
./idpp --no_links  mypage.html

Please see Texinfo HTML Customization Variables for additional information on including/excluding <link> tags.


––no_body Do not update the <body> tag.

By default, the texi-to-HTML converter inserts a lot of (useless) information into the <body> tag which indicates the beginning of the user-visible part of the HTML document.

First, these values are all default values, and are therefore unnecessary. Second, they are outdated HTML constructs. Third, they may, and probably will interfere with the CSS style information in ’infodoc-styles.css’.

The ’idpp’ post-processor discards all this garbage by default, leaving only a pristine '<body>' tag.

However, if your document specifically indicates a <body> declaration (see the Texinfo ’BODYTEXT’ configuration variable), then use the '--no_body' option to preserve the intended <body ...> data. (THIS IS NOT RECOMMENDED.)

Example:
./idpp --no_body  mypage.html

For more information, see Post-processing Notes.


––no_bullet Do not update the <ul> lists.

As mentioned in several places in this document, the Texinfo texi-to-HTML converter does not handle lists well. Fortunately, un-ordered (bullet) lists (created using the Texinfo @itemize command) can be easily corrected by the ’idpp’ post-processor.

By default, ’idpp’ reformats un-ordered lists without any human intervention. However, you can use the '--no_bullet' option to disable the automatic processing of un-ordered lists.

Example:
./idpp --no_bullet  mypage.html

For more information, see Itemized Lists.


––no_uplink Do not modify top node "Up" link.

Do not modify the target specified in the "Up" hyperlink at the top of the document.

By default, ’idpp’ modifies this link to prevent the browser from generating a ’target not found’ message if the user clicks on the link. The defaut value for the hyperlink is set to the top of the current page, and the default display text for the link is set to "(top)".

Note that this option is incompatible with the '--up_target' option, and if both are specified, then the '--no_uplink' option will be ignored.

For more information, see idpp --up_target option above.


––no_block Do not remove extra whitespace from formatted-block objects.

The texi-to-HTML converter uses a double-layer construct when creating pre-formatted block objects. This creates an unnecessary extra blank line in the HTML output.

By default, ’idpp’ removes this extra blank line for the following block objects: ’format’, ’display’, ’example’, ’lisp’ and their ’smallformat’ variants.

Use the '--no_block' option to disable this automatic adjustment.

Example:
./idpp --no_block  mypage.html

For more information, see Other Manual Processing.


––no_author Do not adjust ‘<blockquote>’ ‘author’ field.

If you create a <blockquote> object using the Texinfo ’@quotation’ command or the ’@smallquotation’ command, then you may also have used the optional ’@author’ sub-command.

This combination of commands works well in info-format documents, but looks very bad indeed in HTML-format documents.

By default, ’idpp’ adjusts the position, and if necessary the font size of the ’author’ field.

Use the '--no_author' option to disable this automatic adjustment.

Example:
./idpp --no_author  mypage.html

If no ’@author’ sub-command was used with the ’@quotation’ or ’@smallquotation’ block, then this option does nothing.
For more information, see Quotation Commands.


––no_cartouche Do not remove redundant border style for ‘cartouche’.

A ’cartouche’ block is a paragraph enclosed within a border.
This command has no effect in info-format documents, but in HTML-format documents, the paragraph (<p>...</p>) object is surrounded by a border.

The Texinfo texi-to-HTML converter calls out the ’cartouche’ class for this type of object, but does not define the class. Instead, it (inappropriately, in our view), inserts a border style element directly into the HTML document. This direct styling violates Texinfo’s own stated goal of avoiding direct styling of the document.

Our CSS definition file, ’infodoc-styles.css’, fully defines the cartouche class, but this class conflicts with the directly-styled cartouche paragraph. Therefore, ’idpp’ removes the inappropriate direct styling so that the ’cartouche’ class can control the object. (Note that in the HTML version of this document, this paragraph is defined as a cartouche.)

Use the '--no_cartouche' option to disable this automatic adjustment.

Example:
./idpp --no_cartouche  mypage.html

If the document contains no ’cartouche’ objects, then this option does nothing.
For more information, see Misc Block Modifiers.


––no_contain Do not insert the ‘infodoc_container’ class into document.

The ’idpp’ post-processor inserts a so-called ’container class’ into the styled HTML document to define the left and right borders within which all displayed data must live. In our view, this is significantly more attractive than allowing the HTML text to wander all across the browser window.

However, if you want your data to be un-contained, you may use the '--no_contain' option to disable insertion of the 'infodoc_container' class.

Example:
./idpp --no_contain  mypage.html

This container is described and discussed in:
see Summary of CSS Definitions,
see Adjusting Style Definitions, and
see Basic Manual Processing.


––version Display version number and copyright notice.

This option displays the application title, the application version number, the author’s copyright notice and the GNU GPL license notice.

Note that if this option is specified, then all other options and arguments on the command line will be ignored.

If you need technical support, then make a note of the reported version number and include it with your support request.
See Technical Support.

Example:
idpp --version

The following is an example of the Version message:

Infodoc Post-processor (idpp) version: 0.0.04
Copyright (C) 2014-2015 The Software Samurai

License GPLv3+: GNU GPL version 3 or later <http://gnu.org/licenses/gpl.html>
This is free software: you are free to change and redistribute it.
There is NO WARRANTY, to the extent permitted by law.

––help  (–h) Command-line Help.

Display a list of available command-line options and brief examples.

Note that if specified, a request for Help overrides everything else on the command line (except ’--version’).

If this option is specified, then no source documents will be processed.

All examples are functionally equivalent:
idpp --help
idpp -h
idpp -H
idpp -?


Two additional options are defined for application debugging only:
                      '--scan' and '--book'
Because the definition of these options may change at any time, they are not documented here. Please refer to the ’idpp’ source code (Idpp::GetCommandLineArgs method) for information on using these debugging options.

Additional invocation options and command arguments may be added from time to time. Existing options may be redefined or removed, but only for very good reason.




Next: , Previous: , Up: Infodoc Post-processor   [Contents][Index]

Interface Logic

The design of human-to-computer interactional logic falls midway between engineering and philosophy. For this reason, the way an application gathers information from a user, processes that information and presents the results is seldom, if ever carefully docummented—at least not by the people who wrote it.

Instead, the user is left on his or her own to experimentally determine what the software designer was thinking when she wrote the application, and how that thinking was translated into the actual human-to-computer interface.

Trying to determine the way in which people from a wide variety of language, cultural and intellectual backgrounds "naturally" think about a task is a nearly-impossible challenge. Software designers, if we think about this issue at all, tend to see the "natural" flow of human-to-computer interaction through a very personal lens.

We have a responsibility, then, to explain how the software actually organizes the gathering, processing and reporting of information. While no interface can please everyone, we can at least inform everyone about what we have done.

Editorial: We were repeatedly told by a previous maintainer of one of the GNU packages
that they DON’T WANT TO document the way the software works, because if they do, they
will have to be constantly checking to ensure that the software behaves as documented.
However, most of our GNU community knows that knowledge is power and that detailed
knowledge is freedom. For everyone else,there’s Windoze....
Software Sam


The ’idpp’ Post-Processor Interface Logic

  1. Note that your HTML source document(s) are not modified, so you need not worry about loss or corruption of your source data during processing.

    Each source document specified for processing is renamed as a backup file, that is, a ’~’ (tilde character) is appended to the original filename, and the processed document takes on the original filename.

    Example:
    Source document: 'mypage.html'  is renamed as  'mypage.html~'
    Target document: is written as 'mypage.html'
    

    Note that an existing backup file (if any) will be overwritten.

    Note also that by default backup files are not displayed by most GUI file management utilities. (This is the GUI mavens’ idea of being ’helpful’.) Backup filenames ARE however reported by the console ’ls’ command. Example: ls -l *.htm*

  2. At least one (1) and up to a maximum of (24) source documents may be specified on the command line, (but see idpp -a option).

    IMPORTANT NOTE: Specify filenames ONLY, not a path. The path to a specified file is assumed to be the current working directory, (but see idpp -d option). Also, the specified file must be a ’Regular’ file, not a symbolic link. Symbolic links are not followed.

    Each specified file is validated as an HTML document: If the first line of the document begins with one of the following text sequences, it is considered to be an HTML document. Leading whitespace is ignored, and the test is case insensitive.
    "<!DOCTYPE html"  OR  "<HTML"

    Although this is not a definitive test, we have some confidence that any HTML document created by ’makeinfo’ can be identified in this way.

  3. Each source document specified must exist in the target directory AND it must be valid HTML code. If any file fails the validation test, then no files will be processed.
  4. If an error in processing is encountered, the last line read from the source document will be written to the target file and processing will be terminated. (It cannot be assumed, however, that the last line written to the target actually caused the error.)
    — Previously processed files will be complete.
    — The file in which the error occurred will be incomplete.
    — Any unprocessed source files will be ignored.
    

    Please note that the most likely cause of a processing error is if the parsing algorithm cannot identify an end-of-block token to match a previously identified start-of-block token.

  5. All processing options are optional, except that the ’-i’ option is necessary for invoking Interactive Mode.
  6. A request for command-line help overrides all other options except ’--version’.
  7. A request for the application version (’--version’) overrides all other options.
  8. Options and source document names may be specified in any order. However, mandatory or optional command arguments must immediately follow the command with which they are associated.
    Example:
    ./idpp -toc mypage1.htm --table_border=all mypage2.htm -f mystyles.css
    

    Note that if you accidentally specify the same option more than once, then the argument (if any) for the last option specified takes precedence; however, avoid accidents by avoiding duplication of options.

  9. Certain processing tasks are performed by default.
    See Post-processor Overview.
  10. Other tasks are performed only if the corresponding option is selected.
  11. Default processing tasks may be selectively disabled.
  12. Some options take no arguments (parameters), while other options have mandatory or optional arguments.

    Note that if a command argument contains spaces it must be enclosed in quotation marks so the the shell program will interpret it as a single item.

    Example:
    ./idpp -d 'my html doc directory'
    
  13. There are two types of options:
    • short-form options consist of a single dash (minus sign) followed by a single character.

      Some short-form options have mandatory arguments. These arguments may be specified with or without an intervening space, OR with a connecting ’=’ (equals sign) without intervening spaces:

      The following examples are functionally identical:
      ./idpp -d public_html  mypage.html
      ./idpp -dpublic_html  mypage.html
      ./idpp -d=public_html  mypage.html
      

      Short-form options without arguments may be combined.

      Example:
      ./idpp -tcop mypage.html
      
      The following is also acceptable:
      ./idpp -tcopd=public_html  mypage.html
      
    • long-form options consist of a double dash (two consecutive minus signs) followed by the command.

      Some long-form options have mandatory or optional arguments. If an argument is specified, it must be joined to its option with the ’=’ (equal sign) character without intervening spaces.

      Example:
      ./idpp --up_target='../parent_node.htm' mypage.html
      

      For long-form options, you must specify enough of the command to uniquely identifiy it. Currently, this is (9) characters (7) characters beyond the double dash). However, when new options are added, this relaxed specification may change.

  14. For processing options that require user responses, a plain-text response file may be used. The contents of this file is redirected to ’wcin’ and takes the place of direct user interaction.
    Example:
    ./idpp -top --table_border=specify mypage.html <response.txt
    
    • A response file consists of a a series of response tokens, generally one token per line.
    • If there are too few response items in the file, then you will need to respond manually to the remaining prompts.
    • If the end of your source document is reached, leaving some tokens in the response file unused, then the extra responses will be ignored.
    • Response-item tokens which begin with the ’#’ (hash mark) character are assumed to be comments, and will be ignored. The following example contains a ’d’ character response item followed by a comment. Please note that the comment MUST NOT contain spaces because the space character is the ’bash’ (or other command shell) token delimiter.
               d   #Phone_Number_List
    • For convenience, a response file may optionally contain placeholder response tokens consisting of the literal string:
               ’default_token
      which if read by the user input routine will cause the default response for that query to be inserted at that point in the input stream.

    A response file is useful if you are developing a new document and are repeatedly regenerating the HTML document. For instance, while developing this document, we regenerated the HTML output well over 500 times. For additional examples, please refer to the response file for this document, ’apply_response.txt’.

    Use care with response files because a change in your source document can easily cause the response file to become de-synchronized with the prompts. Also, using a response file on a source document that has already been post-processed will almost certainly cause the responses to be out-of-sequence.

    As an alternative to using response files during document development, simply avoid specifying processing options that require interactive responses unless you are testing that particular part of the document.





Previous: , Up: Infodoc Post-processor   [Contents][Index]

Build idpp from source

The ’idpp’ utility in its current form is a simple console utility written in C++ and using the standard ’wide’ character I/O streams ’wcout’ and ’wcin’.


Preliminaries

First, open a terminal window. then unpack the distribution archive file into a clean directory (see README file for details). Next, navigate to the idpp subdirectory: ’cd Infodoc/idpp’

Tools Needed

Note that building from source requires the GNU compiler ’g++’ version 4.8.0 or later, with full support for the ’gnu++11’ library option. (Compiler versions as early as 4.7.3 MAY work, but this cannot be guaranteed.)

Standard Build

A makefile is provided which by default builds a standard binary executable which references the shared libraries for the target machine. To build the standard binary, simply enter the command:
               ’gmake’       (produces: ’idpp’)

The build should complete without errors and without warnings.
We are, after all, not just animals pooping in the forest.

Optional Static Build

Optionally, the binary can be built as a stand-alone application which does not reference external libraries. Software nerds call this a ’static build’, because it uses the ’-static’ build option. See, we ain’t so dumb:-) This binary should run on any system with the same basic architecture and a compatible operating system. Enter the command:
               ’gmake static’       (produces: ’idpp_s’)

Note, however, that using this option brings into play a number of things that can bite you in the ass, so if you aren’t sure about the configuration of the potential target systems, doing a standard build on each individual target system, (which will reference its shared libraries) is more reliable.

Testing the Build

Test the results by entering the following command:
               './idpp --version'

If the title/copyright/version message is successfully displayed, then congratulations are in order, and you can copy the ’idpp’ binary to a directory on your search path (usually ’/home/yourname/bin’ or ’/usr/local/bin’).

Otherwise, please check your compiler version, environment settings, library paths and the other usual suspects.

If you just can’t get a successful build, please send us a message with all the relevant information, and we will wave our magic wand at the problem. See Technical Support.




Previous: , Up: HTML Post-processing   [Contents][Index]

Manual Post-processing

Automatic post-processing using the ’idpp’ utility is preferred for consistency, speed and ease; however, if you prefer the hands-on approach, or if you want to know the details of what ’idpp’ is doing, simply follow these step-by-step instructions.

Modifying the HTML mark-up by hand is not difficult. You do not need to understand HTML or CSS in order to make these modifications.





Next: , Up: Manual Post-processing   [Contents][Index]

Basic Manual Processing

  1. Copy the ’infodoc-styles.css’ file to the directory where your HTML document lives and open your HTML document for editing.
    We use Bluefish(tm) or jEdit(tm), but any text editor will work.
  2. Replace the ’doctype’ declaration at the top of the file.
    This declaration is the standard way of indicating that what follows is HTML markup. The texi-to-HTML converter generates an out-of-date reference to HTML version 3 or 4 and DTD (Document Type Definition). Unless you are forced to retain compatibility with 15-year-old technology, replace the existing declaration with a simple: <!DOCTYPE html> which is the correct choice for most web documents and is the HTML5 standard.
  3. Just below the <head> tag and above <title>, insert the following two lines which will establish a link to the style sheet file.
    <meta charset="utf-8" /> <!-- Import the global stylesheet -->
    <link rel="stylesheet" href="infodoc-styles.css" lang="en" type="text/css"/>
  4. Delete any other auto-generated metadata in the ’<head>...</head>’ data block: (<meta name=... >) and links (<a>...</a>). These are unnecessary to the rendering of the page, so unless you have a specific reason for retaining them, get rid of them. Two possible exceptions are:
       ’<meta name=\"description...>  OR <meta name=\"keywords...>’
    Although the defaults generated by the texi-to-HTML converter are rather useless, you might, if desired, modify them to be more meaningful.
  5. Delete all auto-generated HTML style definitions in the ’<head>...</head>’ element. These definitions are more completely and robustly defined in the CSS definition file, so these old stub definitions may interfere with our new-and-improved definitions.
  6. Replace the ’<body ...>’ tag with a plain ’<body>’ tag.
    The texi-to-HTML converter embeds several default values for background color, etc. into the <body> tag, and again, these will interfere with our new definitions.
  7. Establish the container class:
        a) Just after <body>, insert  : <div class="infodoc_container">
        b) Just above </body>, insert : </div>  <!-- infodoc_container -->
    This restricts the left and right margins to fit comfortably within a 1280-pixel display and presents a much more pleasing visual style. For detailed information about the container class, see ’.infodoc_container’ in the ’infodoc-styles.css’ definition file.

    If desired, you can enable the border around this container by un-commenting the ’border: 1px solid;’ line in the container definition.

  8. Replace the "Up" Target of your main document.
    The ’Up: (dir)’ target specified in the Table of Contents section will probably not have a legitimate target. If the user clicks it, the browser will generate a target-not-found message. Here is the auto-generated sequence and some suggested modifications.
    Auto-generated:
       Up: <a href="dir.html#Top" accesskey="u" rel="up">(dir)</a>
    Replace with:
       Up: <a href="#" accesskey="u" rel="up">(top)</a>
       (this references the top of the current page)
    Or:
       Up: <a href="../docs.html" accesskey="u" rel="up">(docs)</a>
       (example of the HTML page one level up in the tree)
    
  9. (not really) OPTIONAL:
    The texi-to-HTML converter (as of makeinfo version 5.2) handles lists very poorly. Your ’.texi’ source document almost certainly uses the @itemize and/or the @enumerate commands to create lists, so it is important to know the converter’s weaknesses.
    Bulleted lists:   @@itemize command, yields
                      <ul>...</ul> (bulleted) tag lists
    Enumerated Lists: @@enumerate command, yields 
                      <ol>...</ol> (sequenced) tag lists.
    

    Please refer to the next chapter discussing post-processing of lists: See Manual List Processing.




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Manual List Processing

IMPORTANT NOTE:
The ’idpp’ post-processing utility handles all issues discussed in this chapter with very little human intervention. Please refer to the ’idpp’ command-line options for processing lists:
see Infodoc Post Processor.

Because the texi-to-HTML converter does not handle lists well, it is strongly recommended that all itemized/unordered/bulleted lists AND all enumerated/ordered/sequenced lists be scanned and assigned to specific list-class definitions.

Example : <ol>
Becomes : <ol class="enum-lower-alpha">

Example : <ul class="no-bullet">
Becomes : <ul class="circle-bullet">

The multi-level list below is designed as a real-world example.
'makeinfo' creates a very clean and attractive list in the 
info-format document; however, the corresponding HTML document 
requires significant post-processing.

The HTML document is legible in its raw form; however, without 
post-processing, it looks significantly and confusingly different from 
the original document AND it will not meet any kind of professional 
criteria for HTML documentation.


The following is a summary of the ’infodoc-styles.css’ class definitions which support lists. Please refer to see Summary of CSS Definitions, or directly to the CSS style definitions for more details.



  1. Unordered (bulleted) Lists
    1. The @itemize command generates ’<ul>...</ul>’ list sequences.
    2. The texi-to-HTML converter (v:5.2) correctly specifies the HTML markup for: ’@itemize’ (with no argument) and ’@itemize @bullet’ by generating a ’disc-bullet’ list (bullet is similar to ⚫, but is browser specific).
    3. All other bullet-type arguments specified with the @itemize command are incorrectly handled.
    4. For these, the ’no-bullet’ class is invoked in the HTML markup:
      Example: <ul class="no-bullet"> <li> ... </li></ul>
    5. The bullet character specified in the ’.texi’ source is then embedded within the item itself. This is not actually too ugly, but it is, strictly speaking, wrong. By design, bulleted lists are intended to have a hanging-indent format, where the bullet is set close to the margin, and all text content is inset from the bullet and vertically aligned. Below, is a simulation of what the item should look like and what the texi-to-HTML converter actually generates for an ’@itemize ⚪’ list.
        ⚪ For the 1995 film "Sense and Sensibility," Emma Thompson 
          received Academy Award nominatons for both best actor, and 
          best screenplay, winning in the best screenplay category. 
          Thompson is the only person to have won Oscars for both 
          acting and screenwriting.
      
          ⚪ For the 1995 film "Sense and Sensibility," Emma Thompson 
          received Academy Award nominatons for both best actor, and 
          best screenplay, winning in the best screenplay category. 
          Thompson is the only person to have won Oscars for both 
          acting and screenwriting.
      

      See also the test code for unorderd lists
      (see Itemized Lists).

    6. See the idpp ’–no_bullet’ option for additional information:
      (see idpp --no_bullet option)
    7. One other issue comes into play with unordered lists: the browser will recognize when a bulleted list is nested within another list and will automatically demote the bullet character for the list from ’disc’ to ’circle’ or from ’circle’ to ’square’ unless you have assigned the list to a specific class. The browser will obey the class callout, effectively overriding the automatic bullet-type demotion.


  2. Unordered List Classes
    To change or correct the bullet type generated by default, modify the tag to reference the target class. You may also need to manually reformat the text for each item, but again, by default, the ’idpp’ post-processor will do this for you.
    • ul.no-bullet
      For unordered lists specified in the ’.texi’ source with the command: @itemize @w{}.

      In order to implement the embedded-bullet construct described above, the texi-to-HTML converter unfortunately calls out the ’no-bullet’ class for everything except the browser’s default bullet type.

      What this means in practical terms is that the actual bullet (if any) appearing in the HTML document is rather unpredictable. The following considerations contribute to the confusion:

      – Note that this class definition implements the 
         auto-generated HTML <ul class="no-bullet"> tags
      – If your .texi source uses the @itemize keyword with any 
         bullet argument other than @bullet (or none), then
         whatever bullet you specified is ALREADY shown in the 
         <li> item, although it will appear as ’inside’ the item. 
      – If this class is not defined, then the (default) 
         bullet rendered for each line item is placed outside 
         the item. This is standard HTML behavior; however, you 
         may now have TWO bullet characters in the HTML output.
      – Note that the ’@itemize @w{}’ sequence places a single 
         space character where the bullet would have been, and the 
         line items themselves need no modification.
      – Note that to allow the auto-generator output for lists to 
         stand without modification, the ’no-bullet’ class must be 
         defined–either the default definition created by the 
         auto generator OR in the infodoc-styles.css file
         (but not both).
      
    • ul.disc-bullet
      For unordered lists that use the default disc bullet (•) or similar. This includes lists specified with ’@itemize (no argument)’ or ’@itemize @bullet’, or with any other bullet character which resembles a filled disc. This is the default behavior for unordered lists, so if the ouput looks good, there is no need to change it, but if desired, you can modify it to reference the ’disc-bullet’ class.
      <ul>
      Becomes:
      <ul class="disc-bullet">
      
    • ul.circle-bullet
      For unordered lists that use the ’@itemize’ command with the ’@textdegree’ bullet character or any character which resembles an un-filled circle.
      <ul class="no-bullet">
      Becomes:
      <ul class="circle-bullet">
      
      Then delete:
        a) the embedded degree or other symbol, and
        b) one space character which follows it
      

      The HTML will now look as if the list was generated using direct HTML markup.

    • ul.square-bullet
      For unordered lists that use the ’@itemize’ command with the any bullet character that cannot be described as a ’disc’ or a ’circle’. This is the browser’s fall-back bullet.
      <ul class="no-bullet">
      Becomes:
      <ul class="square-bullet">
      
      Then delete:
        a) the embedded symbol, and
        b) one space character which follows it
      

      The HTML will now look as if the list was generated using direct HTML markup.

    • ul.custom-bullet
      While Texinfo supports any single-column character as a bullet character, HTML currently supports only these bullet types:
      [disc | circle | square | none]
      Forcing an unsupported bullet character in the HTML is not an easy task, but we provide this class in the hope of future expansion of support for HTML ’<ul>’ bullet types.
      <ul>  OR  <ul class="no-bullet">
      Becomes:
      <ul class="custom-bullet">
      


  3. Ordered (sequenced) Lists
    1. The @enumerate command generates ’<ol>...</ol>’ list sequences.
    2. The texi-to-HTML converter (v:5.2) correctly specifies the HTML markup for: ’@enumerate’ (with no argument) and ’@enumerate 1’ by generating a decimal sequence beginning with the number ’1’.
    3. All other bullet-type arguments specified with the @enumerate command are incorrectly handled.
    4. If your ’.texi’ source specifies an enumeration type other than decimal enumeration, then the texi-to-HTML converter ignores your specification. All enumerated lists appear in the HTML as ’<ol>...</ol>’ sequences (no enumeration type) regardless of the type you specified. When the browser displays the page, it will then use the default enumeration, (1 2 3 4 5 ...) which in many cases is not what you specified. (This list you are now reading represents an example of this issue.)

      See also the test code for ordered lists
      (see Enumerated Lists).

    5. See the idpp ’-o’ option for more information:
      (see idpp -o option)
    6. ’makeinfo’ supports numbered lists through the @enumerate command, and can count items in terms of:
        decimal digits  :  1, 2, 3 ... 
        lower-case alpha:  a ... z
        upper-case alpha:  A ... Z

      ’makeinfo’ also offers the option of beginning the count at an arbitrary point in the sequence simply by specifying the starting value. Example: ’@enumerate 21’ will begin the count at ’21’.

      In HTML, numbered list are enclosed within <ol></ol> tags, and can support item counts in terms of:

        decimal digits  :      1, 2, 3 ... 
        lower-case alpha:      a ... z
        upper-case alpha:      A ... Z
        lower-case Roman:      i, ii, iii, iv, v, vi ...
        upper-case Roman:      I, II, III, IV, V, VI ...
        lower-case Greek:      α, β, γ, δ, ε, ζ ...
        decimal, leading '0':  01, 02, 03 ... 10, 11 ...
        
      As well as lower-latin, upper-latin, armenian, georgian and none.
      

      HTML also supports starting the sequence at an arbitrary point. However the texi-to-HTML converter does not pass information about the enumeration type or start point to the HTML document. To specify the enumeration type and optionally the starting value during post-processing, please refer to the ’-o’ and ’-p’ options in see Invoking idpp.



  4. Ordered List Classes
    To correct the enumeration type generated by default, modify the tag to reference the target class.
    • ol.enum-decimal
      For ordered lists that use decimal numbers. This is both the Texinfo and the HTML default for orderd lists, so if the ouput looks good, there is no need to change it, but if desired, you can modify it to reference the ’enum-decimal’ class.
      <ol>
      Becomes:
      <ol class="enum-decimal">
      
    • ol.enum-decimal-zero
      For ordered lists that use decimal numbers with a leading zero.
      <ol>
      Becomes:
      <ol class="enum-decimal-zero">
      
    • ol.enum-lower-alpha
      For ordered lists that use lower-case alphabetical enumeration.
      <ol>
      Becomes:
      <ol class="enum-lower-alpha">
      
    • ol.enum-upper-alpha
      For ordered lists that use upper-case alphabetical enumeration.
      <ol>
      Becomes:
      <ol class="enum-upper-alpha">
      
    • ol.enum-lower-roman
      For ordered lists that use lower-case Roman enumeration.
      <ol>
      Becomes:
      <ol class="enum-lower-roman">
      
    • ol.enum-upper-roman
      For ordered lists that use upper-case Roman enumeration.
      <ol>
      Becomes:
      <ol class="enum-upper-roman">
      
    • ol.enum-lower-greek
      For ordered lists that use lower-case Greek enumeration.
      <ol>
      Becomes:
      <ol class="enum-lower-greek">
      
    • ol.enum-custom
      For ordered lists that use an enumeration type not directly supported by the above class definitions.
      <ol>
      Becomes:
      <ol class="enum-custom">
      

      Then edit the ’infodoc-styles.css’ file to specify the enumeration type to be used. Additional types available in CSS3 are: decimal-leading-zero (infodoc default), lower-latin, upper-latin, armenian, georgian, inherit




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Other Manual Processing

  1. OPTIONAL:
    Eliminate extra blank line before pre-formatted blocks.
    The texi-to-HTML converter (unnecessarily in our view) creates two block header declarations on successive lines causing the extra blank line. This extra whitespace is not critical, but we find it annoying, and the ’idpp’ post-processor corrects this by combining the two block headers on the same line. Example:
       <div class="format">
       <pre class="format">  This is block text.
    Becomes:
       <div class="format"><pre class="format">  This is block text.
    
  2. OPTIONAL:
    If your ’.texi’ source uses the @quotation command, the texi-to-HTML converter generates a ’<blockquote>’ tag to represent it. Because this relies on browser defaults, you may want to call out the ’quotation’ class definition to give you firmer control over what the browser displays.
       <blockquote>
    Becomes:
       <blockquote class="quotation">
    
  3. OPTIONAL:
    If your ’.texi’ source uses the @quotation or @smallquotation commands in conjunction with the optional @author sub-command, you will find that the texi-to-HTML converter handles this rather poorly.

    Scan for the sequence which indicates the @author output, and move it INSIDE the ’</blockquote>’ tag. Example:

       <blockquote>He was a wise man who invented beer.
       </blockquote>
       <div align="center">&mdash; <em>Plato</em>
    Becomes:
       <blockquote>He was a wise man who invented beer.
       <div align="center">&mdash; <em>Plato</em>
       </blockquote>
       
    Note that to beautify the 'author' line, the automatic 
    post-processor takes this one step further:
       <blockquote>He was a wise man who invented beer.
       <br><span style="margin-left:3.2em;">&mdash; <em>Plato</em>
       </p></blockquote>
    
  4. OPTIONAL:
    If your ’.texi’ source uses the @cartouche command (for bordered paragraphs), remove the forced styling created by the texi-to-HTML converter so the ’cartouche’ class can control the output.
       <table class="cartouche" border="1"><tr><td>
    Becomes:
       <table class="cartouche"><tr><td>
    

    Note that the reason the texi-to-HTML converter declares a ’<table>’ element is that in ancient versions of HTML, the ’table’ was the only elements which was defined with borders. This is an obsolete usage, of the ’<table>’ element, but is does not harm the output. However, without removing ’border="1"’ a double border will be generated around the paragraph.

  5. OPTIONAL:
    In the document’s Index there are three ’<table>...<table>’ sequences. Two of these are alphabetical "Jump to:" references. To avoid overlap with the standard ’<table>’ tag definition, point the two "Jump to:" tables to the ’jumpto’ class:
       <table><tr><th valign="top">Jump to: ...
    Becomes:
       <table class="jumpto"><tr><th valign="top">Jump to: ...
    
  6. OPTIONAL:
    If you are using a sequence of interconnected documents, or if you are linking your document into a larger website tree structure, then be sure that the user has valid navigation links among the documents.

    Software Sam uses these links to aid visitors in website navigation; however, they are completely optional.

    Insert two (2) local links, at the top and bottom of the ’infodoc_container’ class. Of course these links can direct the user anywhere, but we direct the user back to the parent page, the main HTML Docs Page.

    <div class="infodoc_interlink"><a href="../docs.html">
    Back To HTML Docs Page </a></div>
        and
    <div class="infodoc_interlink"><a href="../docs.html">
    Back To HTML Docs Page </a></div><br>
    
  7. OPTIONAL:
    Modify the classes called out in the Table of Contents list.
    If you like the unmodified Table of Contents, then skip this step.
    Replace the ’no-bullet’ named class with specific class definitions.
    ♦ 1st TOC level       : <ul class="toc-level1">
    ♦ 2nd TOC level       : <ul class="toc-level2">
    ♦ 3rd (and subsequent): <ul class="toc-level3">
    

    We like this modification to visually and logically distinguish the Table of Contents from the chapter menus, but it is of course optional.

  8. OPTIONAL:
    You may find that the chapter menus make the Table of Contents seem
    redundant. If so, you can comment out or delete the entire Table Of
    Contents section which consists of the following data blocks:
    <h1 class="settitle" align="center">YOUR DOC TITLE</h1>
    <h2 class="contents-heading">Table of Contents</h2>
    <div class="contents"> ... </div>
    Be sure to retain the link targets which are referenced by
    the navigation bars for each node:
    ’Contents’ target: <a name="SEC_Contents"></a>
    ’Top’ target     : <a name="Top"></a>
  9. OPTIONAL:
    To eliminate the navigation bar from the top of each node,
    you will need to do one of the following:
      a) remove each header individually
         These are identified by the sequence:
         <div class="header"> ... </div>
      b) generate the output using ’makeinfo --html --no-headers’.
    See Chapter 24 of the Texinfo documentation ’Generating HTML’
    for more information.
  10. OPTIONAL:
    Because the auto-generator always specifies the <pre> tag as
    <pre class="verbatim"> AND <pre> is specified at all kinds of unlikely points in the output, the unstyled output may not always be what you might expect. To correct this scatter-gun approach, we have defined the top-level <pre> tag and the ’.verbatim’ class to be identical, and we have also defined specialized <pre> tags for various block types, so it is unnecessary to manually modify the HTML output for these cases.
  11. OPTIONAL:
    Special note on documents containing the GNU General Public License and the GNU Free Documentation License.:

    Most Texinfo users write software and documentation to be released under the GPL and FDL licenses, and we include the text of these licenses, provided by the Free Software Foundation in our documentation. However both of these licenses are constructed using enumerated lists, nested within other enumerated lists, and as detailed above, the Texinfo texi-to-HTML converter does a poor job of handling lists, especially nested lists.

    Luckily, or unluckily, few people actually read these licenses; they exist primarily for legal reasons; however, you should be aware of the incorrect formatting which the texi-to-HTML converter applies to these licenses because lawyers really care about this kind of inconsistency in legal documents.

    • As written, each license begins with item ’0’ (zero). Of course, this means that the HTML lists begin with item ’1’ (one).
    • Each license uses a convential construct for multi-level lists. Example:
      5. Conveying Modified Source Versions.
           a. The work must carry ...
           b. The work must carry prominent ...
           c. You Must license ...
      6. Conveying Non-Source Forms.
           a. Convey the object code ...
      

      It puts you to sleep, just looking at it, doesn’t it? However, the texi-to-HTML converter produces this:

      6. Conveying Modified Source Versions.
           1. The work must carry ...
           2. The work must carry prominent ...
           3. You Must license ...
      7. Conveying Non-Source Forms.
           1. Convey the object code ...
      

      Showing an incorrectly formatted contract to a lawyer is like showing red meat to a shark. They are constitutionally unable to resist it. The difference is that sharks are passive by nature, and will completely ignore you unless they’re hungry. Lawyers, on the other hand, are agressive by nature, and they are always hungry. You have been warned.




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Texinfo HTML Options

The Texinfo ’makeinfo’ utility provides a large number of HTML-only commands and customization variables used by the texi-to-HTML converter to customize the format of the HTML document. While many of these have no effect on post-processing, some can significantly impact the operation of the ’idpp’ automatic post-processor.

While our investigation is not comprehensive, some of the most commonly used options and the more critical issues are discussed here.





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Embedded HTML Code

Two sets of Texinfo commands may be used to write data into your HTML document without without affecting output in other formats.

The data within a '@ifhtml ... @end ifhtml' block will appear ONLY in the HTML output and not in any of the other output formats. The following data:
<p style="font-size: 1.5em;"> Big-ass text in an ’ifhtml’ block. </p>
is inserted into an @ifhtml block below. It should appear in the HTML output as simple text (not interpreted by the browser as markup commands). The block should be invisible in the ’.info’ output.

BEGIN BLOCK: <p style="font-size: 1.5em;"> Big-ass text in an ’ifhtml’ block. </p> :END BLOCK

Similar data is inserted into an '@html ... @end html' block below. The data within the block will be copied unmodified to the HTML output, and thus will be read by the browser as HTML markup. Again, the block should be invisible in the ’.info’ output.

BEGIN BLOCK:

Big-ass italic blue text in an 'html' block.

:END BLOCK


Similarly, the '@ifnothtml ... @end ifnothtml' block may be used to write data to all output formats except HTML. The following paragraph will appear in the info-format document, but will not be included in the HTML-format document.
- - - - -
- - - - -




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Texinfo Build Options

This chapter is currently UNDER CONSTRUCTION.

This chapter contains a list of Texinfo customization options and notes on the way these option affect the generation of HTML documents.

The current version of the ’idpp’ post-processor, may not be able to parse some of the special HTML constructs generated when these options are used. The author will investigate these special configuration options and their effects on the HTML output as time permits.

If one or more of these special options is causing problems with your post-processing runs, please leave the author a note via website.
See Technical Support.



Texinfo Configuration Commands



Texinfo Invocation Options

Texinfo HTML Customization Variables

Other Customization Variables



Note on Using Emacs

Emacs has a special mode for creating Texinfo documents, and this mode contains a very large number of build and configuration options which can affect the output created by the texi-to-HTML converter.

While Emacs is a wonderfully feature-rich and flexible environment, this author has not used Emacs since Pterodactyl poop last fell from the skies, and has no intention of revisiting it. Therefore, it is possible that if you are creating ’.texi’ source documents using Emacs, especially with the ’org’ (Organizer) extensions for HTML output, you may generate some source constructs that ’idpp’ cannot parse. If so, you’re on your own, mate!




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Including Entire CSS File

This is just a quick reference. For complete information on inserting CSS style information directly into the HTML output, or embedding HTML code in the .texi source document see the chapter ’Generating HTML’ in the Texinfo documentation.

Important Note: The technique discussed here copies the entire CSS definition file into the ’texi’ source file; however, in general, it is better to define a link to the CSS data file and let the browser read it, rather than copying the entire file into each document.

Use the ’--html’ and ’--css-include=infodoc-styles.css’ options when invoking makeinfo. This will copy the style definitions directly into the HTML output. Although this is certainly possible, it is messy, difficult to read and may require some additional manual tweaking of the HTML document as described in the previous chapter, See Manual Post-processing.

Note also that the ’idpp’ post-processor will not be able to parse a document that includes the entire text of the CSS definition file.

Note: Please don’t eat up someone else’s bandwidth by using
      the ’--css-ref=URL’ option to include CSS data.




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Post-processing Notes

The texi-to-HTML converter makes a valiant effort to generate an HTML document that is similar in most respects to the native info-format document, while incorporating many of the advanced formatting features of HTML and CSS. Unfortunately, the effort has so far been only partially successful.

The following is an overview of the issues related to generating HTML markup directly from ’.texi’ source.



  1. Document Header
    <!DOCTYPE html PUBLIC "-//W3C//DTD HTML 4.01 Transitional//EN" 
    "http://www.w3.org/TR/html4/loose.dtd">
    

    The above declaration is showing its age. Reasonably-strict HTML5 markup is recommended for all new projects. For this reason, the above document header generated by ’makeinfo’ should be replaced by the new standard identifier:
                              <!DOCTYPE html>
    Aside from a possible (very small) performance hit, this has no affect on the actual rendering of the document in any reasonably modern browser and will allow the browser to choose the correct level of standards compliance during rendering. Also, if you embed HTML markup directly into your ’.texi’ source document, it will probably not match the ancient HTML version referenced by the default DOCTYPE header.

    If you absolutely must specify an HTML version or other outdated rendering instructions, please refer to the Texinfo ’DOCTYPE’ or ’FRAMESET_DOCTYPE’ configuration variables: see Texinfo Build Options.
    See also the post-processor option: see idpp --no_doctype option.

    Please note also that DTD (Document Type Definition) was never anything more than a kludge, is no longer used in modern rendering and causes a huge performance hit due to an external URL reference. If your site is still using DTD, you need to take your sys-admin out for lunch and explain the facts of life....

  2. Auto-generated metadata
    In the <head>...</head> section of the document, there are several metadata tags. These data are generally incomplete, out-of-date, or useless, and can therefore be deleted.

    Example:

     <meta name="description" content="gString Text Conversion Guide">
     <meta name="keywords" content="gString Text Conversion Guide">
     <meta name="resource-type" content="document">
     <meta name="distribution" content="global">
     <meta name="generator" content="Bluefish 2.2.6" >
     <meta http-equiv="Content-Type" content="text/html; charset=utf-8">
    

    Please note that the "description" and "keywords" metadata entries shown above can be useful if properly updated.

    • ’<meta name="description" ...>’
      By default, this entry specifies the document title; however, as a Texinfo build option, you can specify the text for this entry using the @documentdescription command: see Texinfo Build Options.
    • ’<meta name="keywords" ...>’
      By default, this entry specifies the document title; however, this is worse than useless. First, search engines no longer use the "keywords" metadata entry due to massive abuse by porn sites, spammers and other lower forms of life. If you want search engines to find the page, place meaningful search keys in the <title> tag, the "description" metadata entry OR register your site with the individual search-engine companies. The only reasonable use for the "keywords" metadata entry that we can identify is for internal searches by corporate or in-house search algorithms.

    See also the post-processor '--no_meta' option:
    see Invoking idpp.

  3. Auto-generated head links
    In the <head>...</head> section of the document, there are several link tags.

    In theory, the browser will scan these tags for link information, however, in general, the default links are bad or useless information. These links will probably do no actual harm, but neither do they perform any useful task and therefore should be deleted.

    Example:

     <link href="#Top" rel="start" title="Top">
     <link href="#Index" rel="index" title="Index">
     <link href="#SEC_Contents" rel="contents" title="Table of Contents">
     <link href="dir.html#Top" rel="up" title="(dir)">
    

    See also the post-processor '--no_links' option:
    see Invoking idpp.

  4. Auto-generated style elements
    In the <head>...</head> section of the document, there are several partially implemented CSS definitions and class-name specifications. These are merely stubs inserted into the document to facilitate the application of CSS style during post-processing.

    Because these stubs interfere with the equivalent, more robust definitions in the ’infodoc-styles.css’ file, THEY MUST BE DELETED.

    Example:

     <style type=:text/css"> 
       a.summary-letter {text-decoration: none}
       blockquote.smallquotation {font-size: smaller}
       div.display {margin-left: 3.2em}
       div.example {margin-left: 3.2em}
       div.indentedblock {margin-left: 3.2em}
       div.lisp {margin-left: 3.2em}
       div.smalldisplay {margin-left: 3.2em}
       div.smallexample {margin-left: 3.2em}
       div.smallindentedblock {margin-left: 3.2em; font-size: smaller}
       div.smalllisp {margin-left: 3.2em}
       kbd {font-style:oblique}
       pre.display {font-family: inherit}
       pre.format {font-family: inherit}
       pre.menu-comment {font-family: serif}
       pre.menu-preformatted {font-family: serif}
       pre.smalldisplay {font-family: inherit; font-size: smaller}
       pre.smallexample {font-size: smaller}
       pre.smallformat {font-family: inherit; font-size: smaller}
       pre.smalllisp {font-size: smaller}
       span.nocodebreak {white-space:nowrap}
       span.nolinebreak {white-space:nowrap}
       span.roman {font-family:serif; font-weight:normal}
       span.sansserif {font-family:sans-serif; font-weight:normal}
       ul.no-bullet {list-style: none}
     </style>
    
  5. <body> tag
    ’makeinfo --html’ generates the following ’body’ start tag (or something similar) by default, based on the global document settings:
    <body lang="en_US" bgcolor="#FFFFFF" text="#000000" link="#0000FF" 
    vlink="#800080" alink="#FF0000">
    

    First, this is isn’t necessarily what we want, and second, it interferes with the style definitions in ’infodoc-styles.css’, so we remove them and use the elements in the external CSS style-definition file. Note that replacing the above with a simple <body> has no apparent effect on the actual rendering of the document because they are all defaults anyway.
    See also the Texinfo ’BODYTEXT’ global variable:
    see Texinfo Build Options.
    See also the post-processor option: see idpp --no_body option.

  6. Intra-page references
    The auto-generated code includes a huge number of <a> tags WITHOUT an ’href’ element, just a ’name’.

    examples: <a name="Introduction-to-gString-1"></a>
              <a name="index-07_002e01-Introduction-to-gString"></a>
    These tags are not rendered because there is no no associated link. They are intra-page link targets. HTML5 uses the following construct for the same purpose:
              <dfn id="Introduction-to-gString-1"></dfn>

    It is not necessary to replace the auto-generated references, they work perfectly; however, you may lose some ’cool-code points’ with the HTML5 validator.

  7. List formatting
    The auto-generated lists have several serious problems; however, until these problems are addressed through Texinfo enhancements, the ’idpp’ post processor handles all itemized and enumerated lists issues.
    • An ordered list, <ol> generates a numbered list by default.
      This is fine, but the default is the ONLY option currently available (Texinfo 5.2).
    • An unordered list, is generated as <ul class"no-bullet"> ; however, if the .no-bullet class is not defined, the item bullets ARE created. For instance, we use lists constructed using ’@itemize @minus’ however if the ’no-bullet’ class is not defined for the html output, a bullet is added BEFORE the ’-’ which doesn’t look awful, but is probably not what you were expecting as output.
    • Unfortunately, the auto-generated Table of Contents ALSO uses
      <ul class="no-bullet"> and looks pretty good with the (inappropriately-generated) multi-level style of bullets.
    • See Texinfo commands: @itemize, @itemize @bullet,
      @itemize @minus, @itemize @w{}, @enumerate, @enumerate 1,
      @enumerate a, @enumerate A
      All of these need to be supported in the HTML output, but as of Texinfo 5.2, they are not fully supported.
    • Texinfo/makeinfo has an off-by-one error in line spacing within un-ordered lists. While this is not critical, you may see less vertical spacing in the HTML than what you expected.
  8. How makeinfo uses some common HTML tags.
    • <h1>
      ’makeinfo’ defines this tag either with ’class="settitle"’ when used as the document title; OR with ’class="top"’ as the page title for the main menu. Because neither class is defined, the browser’s default <h1> style is used to render the titles.
    • <h2>
      ’makeinfo’ defines this tag ’class="contents-heading"’ i.e. The heading for the Table of Contents section. Because this class is not defined, the browser’s default <h2> style is used to render this heading.
    • <h3>
      ’makeinfo’ defines this tag in several different ways: ’class="section"’, ’class="heading"’, ’class="unnumberedsec"’ and others. Because none of these classes are defined, each of these defaults to the browser’s <h3> style.
    • <h4>
      ’makeinfo’ defines this tag ’class="subheading"’ and ’class="subsubheading"’, but again, because the classes are not defined, the browser’s default style is used.
    • <p>
      ’makeinfo’ does not define a class/style when using the paragraph tag, but uses it in a number of potentially incompatible scenarios which derive from the parent class. So long as everything uses the default style, there is no serious problem, but if a parent class is defined, it will be necessary to also define the associated <p> tag.
    • <table>
      ’makeinfo’ uses the <table> tag when creating menus, the Table of Contents, the Index, and of course in generating output for the @multitable command. Within a <table> construct, there will also be <tr>, <td>, <th> and of course <a> tags. All of these use the browser’s default style. To regain control of the table construct, it is necessary to define all of these sub-tags.
    • <ul>
      ’makeinfo’ supports un-ordered lists through the @itemize command, and any single character may be specified as the bullet character. The most common bullet characters are @bullet (default), @minus, @textdegree (standard ’degrees’ symbol: &deg; &#176;)
      A no-bullet option is also supported using the @w{} sequence. Note that this option actually generates a ’space’ character as a bullet.

      Note that for HTML documents the generated lists are incompletely implemented.
      For more information: see Itemized Lists.

      In HTML, unordered lists are enclosed within <ul></ul> tags, and can support certain pre-defined bullet characters or a no-bullet option through a CSS style element:
      list-style-type= [disc | circle | square | none];
      The styles for un-ordered lists can be found in the group of <ul> CSS classes defined in the ’infodoc-styles.css’ file.

    • <ol>
      ’makeinfo’ supports ordered lists through the @enumerate command, with an argument of:
      [decimal numbers | lower-case alpha | upper-case alpha | none]

      Note that for HTML documents the generated lists are incompletely implemented.
      For more information: see Enumerated Lists.

      In HTML, ordered lists are enclosed within <ol></ol> tags, and can support a number of enumeration types.
      The styles for ordered lists can be found in the group of <ol> CSS classes defined in the ’infodoc-styles.css’ file.




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Makeinfo Testing




Next: , Up: Makeinfo Testing   [Contents][Index]

Testing Overview

The Test Document

This document is designed to test the capabilities of the Texinfo texi-to-HTML converter. We have designed the ’texi’ source to exercise all the major functionality that could affect the generation of an HTML markup document.

This test document is certainly not comprehensive. It does not try to validate HTML/CSS style-definition inheritance through deeply-nested objects; however, common object-nesting constructs for Texinfo documentation such as multi-level lists work as expected.

Test output is generated by Texinfo (makeinfo) version 5.2.
HTML rendering and post-processing verified in Firefox version 32.0.



Rebuilding the ’info’ and HTML documents

Rebuilding the test suite from the ’infodoc_XX.texi’ source requires installation of the ’makeinfo’ utility, version 5.2 or higher.
A ’Makefile’ is provided which rebuilds the documents in both info-format and HTML-format.

Note that older versions of ’makeinfo’ may work, but un-addressed bugs in these older versions may cause some loss of beauty in your document.

  1. If you have not yet built the ’idpp’ Infodoc Post Processor for your system, do it now. See Build idpp from source.
  2. Open a console window and verify that the correct version of makeinfo is installed: 'makeinfo --version'
  3. Navigate to the ’Infodoc’ directory which contains the ’infodoc_0X.texi’ group of source documents.
  4. Use the gmake utility to invoke makeinfo: 'gmake'
    This will build both the ’.info’ and ’.HTML’ format documents.
  5. Run the ’idpp’ post-processor on the raw HTML document.
    This is done with the help of a simple ’bash’ shell script and an automatic response file which responds to the interactive prompts from the post-processor: './applycss'

    Note that the build requires that a copy of the file ’infodoc-styles.css’ be in the ’Infodoc’ subdirectory.

    The original HTML document is not modified. The CSS style is applied to a COPY of the original file which is named 'infodoc_css.html'.

    Note that you may also respond manually to the prompts by modifying the execution line of the shell script to exclude the response file.
    './idpp/idpp -toc --table_border=specify infodoc_css.html'

  6. Also, please feel free to invoke the post-processor utility with any and all options in order to become familiar with its functionality. Please refer to the chapter on invoking the ’idpp’ utility: see Invoking idpp for more information.


Texinfo and the HTML Converter

Please note that Chapter 22 of the Texinfo documentation describes several ’HTML Customization Variables’. For consistency in testing, the current version of this test document does not use any of those modifiers and relies on the defaults for these variables.

The texi-to-HTML converter is an heroic effort on the part of the Texinfo volunteers at gnu.org, providing serviceable HTML which leverages the default behavior of browser rendering engines.
However, as of version 5.2, the converter does have a number of issues for which we try to compensate using our style definitions. The most noticeable of these are font size, line spacing and list processing. As these and other converter problems are addressed, we will update the style definitions and this document to reflect the changes.

To better understand the specific issues involved, open the default HTML and styled HTML files side-by-side in your browser and compare the formatting of each object defined for the test.

infodoc.html       raw texi-to-HTML output
infodoc_css.html   HTML output with CSS styles applied

This project is a work-in-progress, so please leave us a note about your experiences.

Faithfully yours, Software Sam – http://www.SoftwareSam.us/
http://www.SoftwareSam.us/



- - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - -
Please note that a number of Texinfo bugs and other issues have 
been uncovered during the development of this project. The author 
has reported all these bugs and has discussed the other issues 
with the Texinfo group. Several bugs, both in the 'makeinfo' 
utility and in the HTML converter have already been corrected and 
will be included in the next major Texinfo release. 
Each identified issue is marked in the 'texi' source file using 
the literal sequence: '@c BUG!'. 
Note that this is a 'texi' comment and the current state of the 
bug repair is noted on that comment line.

The author wishes to express his appreciation for the great 
support and encouragement received from Karl, Pat, Gavin, and 
the whole Texinfo group during the development of this project. 
- - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - -



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Default Style Set

The following is a list of all styles defined by the texi-to-HTML converter. These definitions are very simple and not particularly robust, but they provide hooks for assigning more comprehensive definitions to the styles defined and used by the generated HTML output.

It must be assumed that the designer of the texi-to-HTML converter considered this to be the complete list of style definitions needed to represent the conversion from texi source to HTML; so logically, if we fully define all of these classes in a CSS stylesheet file, then we will have covered most aspects of the designer’s intent. Bug fixes and stylistic enhancements, of course, may follow.

Note that the entire contents of the <style></style> sequence is commented out in the generated HTML code, BUT that these definitions are nevertheless seen by the browser are are applied where references to them are made. This is odd, and is likely related to the historical lack of standards in delimiting comments in HTML code. The sequence <!--  --> is an HTML comment but is ignored when encountered inside a CSS definition.

This ’texi’ source file is designed so that the HTML output will produce data sequences which invoke each of the following definitions. Some object references are obvious because they call out the texi command names, but others are obscure or complex and require some fancy footwork. See the following chapters for details of our research.

The Auto-generated Style Definitions

This HTML style-definition sequence is generated by the texi-to-HTML converter and is located in the <head></head> section of the document. For convenience, we have listed the items functionally, rather than alphabetically, and have provided references to the locations in this document where the styles are invoked.

Note that if you apply the advanced styles defined in infodoc-styles.css, then the auto-generated style sequence should be deleted from the HTML to avoid conflicts.

For more information, please see the chapter
see HTML Post-processing.

<style type="text/css">
<!--
blockquote.smallquotation {font-size: smaller}
   This definition is used by, (see Quotation Commands).

div.indentedblock {margin-left: 3.2em}
div.smallindentedblock {margin-left: 3.2em; font-size: smaller}
   These definitions are used by, (see Indentedblock Commands).

div.display {margin-left: 3.2em}
pre.display {font-family: inherit}
div.smalldisplay {margin-left: 3.2em}
pre.smalldisplay {font-family: inherit; font-size: smaller}
   These definitions are used by, (see Display Commands).

div.example {margin-left: 3.2em}
div.smallexample {margin-left: 3.2em}
pre.smallexample {font-size: smaller}
div.lisp {margin-left: 3.2em}
   This definition is specified as identical to the @example command
div.smalllisp {margin-left: 3.2em}
   This definition is specified as identical to the @smallexample command.
pre.smalllisp {font-size: smaller}
   These definitions are used by, (see Example Commands).

pre.format {font-family: inherit}
pre.smallformat {font-family: inherit; font-size: smaller}
   These definitions are used by, (see Format Commands).

ul.no-bullet {list-style: none}
   This definition is used by, (see Itemized Lists).

pre.menu-comment {font-family: serif}
pre.menu-preformatted {font-family: serif}
   These definitions are used by, (see InfoMenu Structure).

span.roman {font-family:serif; font-weight:normal}
span.sansserif {font-family:sans-serif; font-weight:normal}
   These definitions are used by, (see Font Modification).

a.summary-letter {text-decoration: none}
   This definition is used in generating the index, (see Index).

kbd {font-style:oblique}
   This definition is used by, (see Object Indicators)..

span.nolinebreak {white-space:nowrap}
span.nocodebreak {white-space:nowrap}
   These definitions are used by, (see Misc Block Modifiers).
-->
</style>
Note that the list is not symmetrical:
......................................
  1. The @quotation command uses the HTML <blockquote> element directly.
    (This is a logical error. see Quotation Commands.)
  2. The @example command generates ’<pre class="example">’, but ’pre.example’ is never defined.
    (This causes incorrect font-size inheritance in the raw output.)
  3. The @lisp command generates ’<pre class="lisp">, but ’pre.lisp’ is never defined.
    (This causes incorrect font-size inheritance in the raw output.)
  4. The @format command generates ’<div class="format">, but div.format is never defined.
    (This causes incorrect font-size inheritance in the raw output.)
  5. The @smallformat command generates ’<div class="smallformat">, but div.smallformat is never defined.
    (This causes incorrect font-size inheritance in the raw output.)
  6. The ’pre.menu-comment’ and ’pre.menu-formatted’ classes are defined, but never used. See see InfoMenu Structure for details.
  7. The Index uses <table class="index-cp"> ... </table>, but the class is never defined. It seems to work fine even without it, but we have defined a simple stub definition for it in case problems surface later.
    See also notes at end of Index chapter (see Index Notes)..
  8. In several places, the fact that a referenced class is undefined, causes a fallback to the default HTML font size for the browser, and this font size is much too small for the surrounding text. This is compensated by defining the class in ’infodoc-styles.css’.



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Basic Tests

This section includes the most basic tests: Headings and Body Text.
In the HTML output, plain body text is written inside a set of
paragraph tags: <p> ... </p>

Note that ’makeinfo’ automatically demotes @section commands if they are in subordinate nodes (chapters) or other subordinate constructs. For instance, this chapter is subordinate to the ’Makeinfo Testing’ chapter, so defining a @section here, actually generates a @subsection in both the ’info’ and HTML documents. This automatic demotion does not apply to @heading commands because they are not indexed.

Top-level ’@heading’ (or ’@section’)

It is a pleasure to tell you about my recent trip to New Zealand’s Great Barrier Reef.

The generated HTML for this command is:

<h3 class="heading">...</h3>
    OR
<h3 class="section">...</h3>

Second-level ’@subheading’ (or ’@subsection’)

It is a pleasure to tell you about my recent trip to New Zealand’s Great Barrier Reef.

The generated HTML for this command is:

<h4 class="subheading">...</h4>
    OR
<h4 class="subsection">...</h4>

Third-level ’@subsubheading’ (or ’@subsubsection’)

It is a pleasure to tell you about my recent trip to New Zealand’s Great Barrier Reef.

The generated HTML for this command is:

<h4 class="subsubheading">...</h4>
    OR
<h4 class="subsubsection">...</h4>
Note that the 'subsubheading' and subsubsection' classes are 
not defined by default, but ARE defined in 'infodoc-styles.css'.



Next: , Previous: , Up: Makeinfo Testing   [Contents][Index]

List Commands




Next: , Up: List Commands   [Contents][Index]

Itemized Lists

Itemized lists are created using the @itemize command with or without an argument indicating the bullet character to use.

Compliance:
Output to ’info’ document: as specified
Output to ’HTML’ document: as specified EXCEPT as noted below

The generated HTML for this command is:
For ’@itemize’ (no argument) and ’@itemize @bullet’ :
<ul> <li> ... </li> </ul>
For other bullet types:
<ul class="no-bullet"> <li> ... </li> </ul>

PLEASE NOTE:
The texi-to-HTML conversion for itemized lists does not handle the bullet argument cleanly. The HTML code generated from the first two examples correctly takes advantage of the default HTML behavior.

However, the HTML code for the remaining examples references the ’no-bullet’ class and whatever bullet character was specified is embedded inside the item itself. This would not be a big issue except that second-line indent for the item is vertically aligned with the bullet character rather than being inline with the body of the item. And although we can see the technical reason for this implementation, it looks nasty.

Note that the Infodoc Post-processor handles these embedded bullet characters and the associated vertical mis-alignment, but we are hoping that the next major release of Texinfo/makeinfo will correct the underlying problem.



itemize command without argument (defaults to ’@bullet’)

itemize command with ’@bullet’ argument

itemize command with ’@minus’ argument

Note that the ’@minus’ argument generates U+2212 (Unicode minus)
for ’info’ output, but U+002D (ASCII minus) for HTML output.

itemize command with ’greater-than’ (U+003E) argument

itemize command with ’medium circle’ (U+26AA) argument

itemize command with ’small square’ (U+25AA) argument

HTML output only: a directly-inserted copy of above, referencing the "square-bullet" class

itemize command with ’no-bullet’ (@w{}) (U+0020) argument

Note that this generates an extra space character in the ’info’ output where the bullet would have been, which is consistent with the other explicit bullet types. ’Outside position’ in HTML output is blank, and no extra space character is embedded in the line item. This is the correct ’no-bullet’ sequence for the HTML output.


Direct HTML markup passed through converter

The following examples are enclosed within a non-converted sequence:
             ’@html ... @end html’
The examples reference the style definitions within the ’infodoc-styles.css’ file. If this file is not referenced within the HTML output, then the examples will be style-less and therefore not representative of the referenced classes.

This code will not be visible within the ’info’ output, but should be passed through the texi-to-HTML converter as unprocessed HTML markup.

Some unprocessed HTML code examples for <ul> lists.
Requires linking in the 'infodoc-styles.css' file.

The hard-coded styles below are created using <ul style="list-style-type:xxx'> .
Note that the older <ul type="xxx"> construct may one day cease to work.
It is deprecated in HTML4 and not supported in HTML5.



Reasonable texi-to-HTML logic

Note that HTML supports:
’disc’ (default), ’circle’ and ’square’ bullet types, plus ’none’.
Note: Bullet character SHOULD NOT be embeded within the item.

if ( argument == none || argument == @bullet )
   generate: <ul class="disc-bullet"> ... </ul>  OR  <ul> ... </ul>
      (note: the default bullet type is 'disc')
else if ( argument == @w{} || (TABLE OF CONTENTS) )
   generate: <ul class="no-bullet"> ... </ul>
else if ( argument == @textdegree || argument == @BCIRCLE(U+26AC) )
   generate: <ul class="circle-bullet"> ... </ul>
else
   generate: <ul class="square-bullet"> ... </ul>
      (note: for bullet characters not supported by   )
      ( HTML, default to the third type of HTML bullet)

If the specified class is not defined, the browser will generate the default ’disc’ bullet list (or nested-list equivalent); however, if the class is defined, then the browser will obey. (It’s GOOD to be the king! − Mel Brooks)




Previous: , Up: List Commands   [Contents][Index]

Enumerated Lists

Compliance:
Output to ’info’ document: as specified
Output to ’HTML’ document: as specified EXCEPT as noted below

The generated HTML for this command is:

   <ol>
      <li> ... </li>
      <li> ... </li>
   </ol>

PLEASE NOTE:
The texi-to-HTML converter uses the HTML default sequence above for all markup generated from ’@enumerate’ lists, regardless of the argument specified in the ’texi’ source. For lists specified using ’@enumerate’ (no argument) or ’@enumerate 1’, the HTML output defaults to the correct behavior.

Other enumeration types are ignored by the texi-to-HTML converter. While this is annoying and technically incorrect, we can’t really classify it as a bug because the converter would have to be enhanced to support all the enumeration types tested here. So, let’s call it an urgent enhancement request. Until that happens, we can use some post-processing to assign CSS definitions for each of the unsupported enumeration types.

PLEASE NOTE:
The texi-to-HTML converter has an off-by-one problem with item spacing in lists. This is not a serious issue, but without styling, the ’info’ output and the HTML output will have different spacing between items.

enumerate command without argument

  1. First item
    Was Miss Woozy Wombat whisked away by Wallowing Wallaby?
  2. Second item
    Perhaps Polly Platypus is playing with Penelope Potoroo.

enumerate command with numeric argument

  1. First item
    Was Miss Woozy Wombat whisked away by Wallowing Wallaby?
  2. Second item
    Perhaps Polly Platypus is playing with Penelope Potoroo.

enumerate command with lower-case alpha argument

  1. First item
    Was Miss Woozy Wombat whisked away by Wallowing Wallaby?
  2. Second item
    Perhaps Polly Platypus is playing with Penelope Potoroo.

enumerate command with upper-case alpha argument

  1. First item
    Was Miss Woozy Wombat whisked away by Wallowing Wallaby?
  2. Second item
    Perhaps Polly Platypus is playing with Penelope Potoroo.

enumerate commands with TARGETED arguments

These will receive post-processing for 'infodoc_css.html'.

(targeted lower-alpha)

  1. First item
    Was Miss Woozy Wombat whisked away by Wallowing Wallaby?
  2. Second item
    Perhaps Polly Platypus is playing with Penelope Potoroo.

(targeted upper-alpha)

  1. First item
    Was Miss Woozy Wombat whisked away by Wallowing Wallaby?
  2. Second item
    Perhaps Polly Platypus is playing with Penelope Potoroo.

(targeted lower-roman, ’info’ and HTML will not be symmetrical)

  1. First item
    Was Miss Woozy Wombat whisked away by Wallowing Wallaby?
  2. Second item
    Perhaps Polly Platypus is playing with Penelope Potoroo.

(targeted upper-roman, ’info’ and HTML will not be symmetrical)

  1. First item
    Was Miss Woozy Wombat whisked away by Wallowing Wallaby?
  2. Second item
    Perhaps Polly Platypus is playing with Penelope Potoroo.

(targeted lower-greek, ’info’ and HTML will not be symmetrical)

  1. First item
    Was Miss Woozy Wombat whisked away by Wallowing Wallaby?
  2. Second item
    Perhaps Polly Platypus is playing with Penelope Potoroo.

Direct HTML markup passed through converter

The following examples are enclosed within a non-converted sequence:
             ’@html ... @end html’
The examples reference the style definitions within the ’infodoc-styles.css’ file. If this file is not referenced within the HTML output, then the examples will be style-less and therefore not representative of the referenced classes.

This code will not be visible within the ’info’ output, but should be passed through the texi-to-HTML converter as unprocessed HTML markup.

Some unprocessed HTML code examples for <ol> lists.
Requires linking in the 'infodoc-styles.css' file.

Note that the older (possibly deprecated) <ol type="xxx"> construct may no longer work.
For this reason, we use CSS to specify the enumeration type: <ol style:"list-style-type:xxx"> ... </ol>

  1. Default 'ol' Element
  2. Default 'ol' Element
  1. 'ol' Element with hard-coded 'decimal' style
  2. 'ol' Element with hard-coded 'decimal' style
  1. 'ol' Element referencing 'enum-decimal' class
  2. 'ol' Element referencing 'enum-decimal' class
  1. 'ol' Element with hard-coded 'lower-alpha' style
  2. 'ol' Element with hard-coded 'lower-alpha' style
  1. 'ol' Element referencing 'enum-lower-alpha' class
  2. 'ol' Element referencing 'enum-lower-alpha' class
  1. 'ol' Element with hard-coded 'upper-alpha' style
  2. 'ol' Element with hard-coded 'upper-alpha' style
  1. 'ol' Element referencing 'enum-upper-alpha' class
  2. 'ol' Element referencing 'enum-upper-alpha' class
  1. 'ol' Element with hard-coded 'lower-roman' style
  2. 'ol' Element with hard-coded 'lower-roman' style
  1. 'ol' Element referencing 'enum-lower-roman' class
  2. 'ol' Element referencing 'enum-lower-roman' class
  1. 'ol' Element with hard-coded 'upper-roman' style
  2. 'ol' Element with hard-coded 'upper-roman' style
  1. 'ol' Element referencing 'enum-upper-roman' class
  2. 'ol' Element referencing 'enum-upper-roman' class
  1. 'ol' Element with hard-coded 'lower-greek' style
  2. 'ol' Element with hard-coded 'lower-greek' style
  1. 'ol' Element referencing 'enum-lower-greek' class
  2. 'ol' Element referencing 'enum-lower-greek' class
  1. 'ol' Element referencing 'enum-custom' class
  2. 'ol' Element referencing 'enum-custom' class
  3. 'ol' Element referencing 'enum-custom' class
  4. 'ol' Element referencing 'enum-custom' class
  5. 'ol' Element referencing 'enum-custom' class


Notes on Enumeration

Implementation Issues
Note that HTML supports multiple-language enumeration, 
but these are the basic set: ’decimal’ (default), 
’decimal-leading-zero’, ’lower-alpha’, ’upper alpha’, 
’lower-roman’, ’upper-roman’ and ’lower-greek’ enumeration 
types, plus ’none’.

Our Texinfo enumerated lists may never be fully symmetrical with HTML,
because we allow starting the count at other than ’1’ ’a’ ’A’,
(but see the (possibly deprecated) ’start’ attribute for the <ol> element).

Post-processing
At this time, (Texinfo 5.2) post-processing of the HTML will be 
necessary for support of the new enumerators. For lower- and 
upper-case Alpha which begin at ’a’ or ’A’, this is a straightforward 
addition of a class name.
   <ol> ... </ol>  becomes  <ol class="enum-lower-alpha">> ... </ol>
                        or  <ol class="enum-upper-alpha">> ... </ol>
Other enumerators (or sequences that do not start at the beginning) 
are somewhat more complex because they currently have no common 
equivalent between the ’info’ and HTML output formats.

Enhancement Possibilities
An enhancement proposal has been submitted to the Texinfo group at 
gnu.org. This proposal outlines a method for direct support of Roman 
and Greek enumerators in Texinfo, and/or the method of embedding a 
specific class call-out for these into the HTML output. This proposal 
is under consideration. To see the full text of the proposal, visit 
the Texinfo bug report archive:
         27 Nov. 2014 "@itemize and @enumerate enhancements"

Proposal Summary:

   − @lowerroman  OR  
   − @lowerroman{n} (where ’n’ is the starting value)
           lower-case Roman numeral enumeration: i, ii, iii, iv, v, ...
   − @upperroman  OR  
   − @upperroman{n} (where ’n’ is the starting value)
           upper-case Roman numeral enumeration: I, II, III, IV, V, ...
   − @lowergreek  OR  
   − @lowergreek{n} (where ’n’ is the starting value)
           lower-case Greek enumeration: α, β, γ, δ, ε, ...
           Note that lower-case Greek lives at
           Unicode U+03B1 through U+03C9.
   − Alternatively, any lower-case Greek letter could 
           signal a start of enumeration from that point.
           Example: @enumerate β
           Note however, that Roman sequences use ASCII characters, 
           and these would be indistinguishable from alphabetical 
           enumeration without an additional environment-modification 
           switch.
   − For symmetry, we could add
           @loweralpha and @loweralpha{}
           @upperalpha and @upperalpha{}
           In our opinion, this is actually a much cleaner implementation 
           than the current specification-by-literal-value.

Reasonable texi-to-HTML logic

// (test in order of likelihood)
if ( argument == (DECIMAL NUMBER) || argument == (NONE) )
   info: 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, ...  (or start at specified point)
   HTML: <ol> ... </ol>
else if ( argument >= 'a' && argument <= 'z' || argument == @loweralpha )
   info: 'a'-'z' as currently implemented, @loweralpha as if it were 'a',
         or @loweralpha{n} where 'n' is the start point
   HTML: <ol class="enum-lower-alpha"> ... </ol>
else if ( argument >= 'A' && argument <= 'Z' || @upperalpha )
   info: 'A'-'Z' as currently implemented, @upperalpha as if it were 'A'
         or @upperalpha{n} where 'n' is the start point
   HTML: <ol class="enum-upper-alpha"> ... </ol>
if ( argument == @lowerroman )
   info: i, ii, iii, iv, v, ...
         or @lowerroman{n} where 'n' is the start point
   HTML: <ol class="enum-lower-roman"> ... </ol>
else if ( argument == @upperroman )
   info: I, II, III, IV, V, ...
         or @upperroman{n} where 'n' is the start point
   HTML: <ol class="enum-upper-roman"> ... </ol>
else if ( argument == @lowergreek )
   info: α, β, γ, δ, ε, ...
         or @lowergreek{n} where 'n' is the start point
   HTML: <ol class="enum-lower-greek"> ... </ol>
else     // (default to decimal)
   info: 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, ...
   HTML: <ol> ... </ol>



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Block Commands

This chapter contains test data for the Texinfo block-oriented commands.




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Quotation Commands

The ’@quotation’ Command

The @quotation block has the following characteristics:

  1. block is left-indented AND right-indented
  2. block inherits the font family and font size from the enclosing environment
  3. line breaks flow and whitespace is compacted
  4. embedded Texinfo commands are expanded

Compliance:
Output to ’info’ document: as specified EXCEPT as noted below
Output to ’HTML’ document: as specified EXCEPT as noted below

The generated HTML for this command is:
<blockquote><p> ... </p></blockquote>
The generated HTML for the optional @author sub-command is
<div align="center"><em> ... </em></div>

Quotations are indented at both left and right edges so the text will flow in a more confined space. Examples show quotation block with the @author command, and both with and without the optional heading.

PLEASE NOTE: A bug in makeinfo v:5.2 which fails to define the right margin of the quotation block. (this bug has been reported)
(This bug does not apply to HTML output, but see next note).

PLEASE NOTE: The generated HTML for this is simply:
  <blockquote><p> ... </p></blockquote>
The HTML ’blockquote’ tag does not include a ’margin-right modifier, and is therefore not the same thing as the @quotation command. This is a logical error in the HTML output, but ’infodoc-styles.css’ compensates by redefining the HTML <blockquote> element to indent on both left and right margins.

PLEASE NOTE: There is another bug in makeinfo v:5.2 related to the @smallquotation command. The ’@author’ sub-command (if present) is not visible in the ’info’ output.(This bug has been reported.) Note that the ’author’ field is correctly generated in the HTML output.

PLEASE NOTE: The documentation says that the @quotation line and @end quotation lines do not generate a line of output. This is true in the ’info’ output but the HTML output generates a blank line before the block. This means that constructing ’correct’ formatting for info output is ’incorrect’ for HTML output. It is unlikely that anything can be done about this except through manual post-processing.

PLEASE NOTE: Centering the @author output is simple and reasonably effective in the ’info’ output, BUT looks like crap in the HTML output. For the HTML, we have recommended something like the following, but no action has been taken.
div.author {margin-left: 20%;} or div.author {text-indent: 20%;}
  then
<div class="author"><em> ... </em></div>
If using a percentage is unacceptable, just use the ’margin-left: 3.2em;’ as is done in other indent situations.

PLEASE NOTE: Also related to the @author sub-command: There should be no blank line in the output between the body of the quotation and the author line. This is true in the ’info’ output, but the HTML output generates a blank line between them.



Quotations with, and without optional header text:

"Hab SoSlI’ Quch!" Be careful when using this phrase since a challenge will surely follow - and you will very likely experience death by bat’telh.
traditional

Klingon Insult: "Hab SoSlI’ Quch!" Be careful when using this phrase since a challenge will surely follow - and you will very likely experience death by bat’telh.
traditional

The ’@smallquotation’ Command

The @smallquotation is the same as @quotation above except that the font size is smaller. The generated HTML output defines this block with
<blockquote class="smallquotation"><p> ... </p></blockquote>
The generated HTML for the optional @author sub-command is
<div align="center"><em> ... </em></div>

PLEASE NOTE: If the optional @author command is used with the @smallquotation command, the text for the author’s name does not match the text of the quotation itself. This is a bug that should be addressed if the Texinfo group takes our suggestion about revising the output for @quotation and @smallquotation command blocks.
Until then, the automatic post-processor utility compensates.

Heroes are seldom born. Instead, they spring to life when circumstances demand it and recede into the background when the crisis has passed. The medieval knight-errant may have been heroic at times, but was essentially just an adventurer. Whipping out one’s sword and challenging someone to a duel to prove "manliness" is not heroic; it is arrogant, cruel and childish, resembling nothing quite so much as trying to stab someone with your metaphorical d..k.
anon




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Indentedblock Commands

The ’@indentedblock’ Command

The @indentedblock command has the following characteristics:

  1. block is left-indented
  2. block inherits the font family and font size from the enclosing environment
  3. line breaks flow and whitespace is compacted
  4. embedded Texinfo commands are expanded

Compliance:
Output to ’info’ document: as specified
Output to ’HTML’ document: as specified

The generated HTML for this command is:
<div class="indentedblock"><p> ... </p></div>

When encouraging a shark to eat from your hand, be sure to have a paramedic AND a psychiatrist standing by for an immediate debriefing regarding the defective contents of your skull structure.

The ’@smallindentedblock’ Command

The generated HTML for this command is:
<div class="smallindentedblock"><p> ... </p></div>

When encouraging a shark to eat from your hand, be sure to have a paramedic AND a psychiatrist standing by for an immediate debriefing regarding the defective contents of your skull structure.




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Example Commands

The ’@example’ Command

The @exaple block has the following characteristics:

  1. block is left-indented
  2. a fixed-width font family is used
  3. the font size is reduced; (however, see notes below)
  4. line break and whitespace formatting are retained as written
  5. embedded Texinfo commands are expanded

Compliance:
Output to ’info’ document: as specified
Output to ’HTML’ document: as specified EXCEPT as noted below

The generated HTML for this command is:
<div class="example"><pre class="example"> ... </pre></div>
  and
<div class="smallexample"><pre class="smallexample"> ... </pre></div>

PLEASE NOTE: The HTML seems to be unnecessarily complex because the ’example’ and ’smallexample’ classes are themselves defined as ’pre’ making the <pre...> tag redundant.
See also discussion of the @exdent command: (see exdent issues).
PLEASE NOTE: The HTML font size changes to the page default. (which is almost certainly a bug!). We believe that the font family should change to fixed-width as specified, BUT that the font size should be inherited–or at most stepped down only one size.
PLEASE NOTE: The documentation says that the @example block delimiters do not generate a line of output. This is true in the ’info’ output but the HTML output generates a blank line before the block because the <div> and <pre> classes are defined on successive lines. This means that constructing ’correct’ formatting for info output is ’incorrect’ for HTML output.

For output formats that support it, enclosing text which surrounds an @example block should be visually different from the contents of the block.

"Hab SoSlI' Quch!" Be careful when using this phrase since a challenge will 
surely follow   -   and you will very likely experience death by bat'telh.

Surrounding text surrounding text surrounding text surrounding text


The ’@smallexample’ Command

The @smallexample is the same as @example above except that the font size is smaller.

Surrounding text surrounding text surrounding text surrounding text

"Hab SoSlI' Quch!" Be careful when using this phrase since a challenge will 
surely follow   -   and you will very likely experience death by bat'telh.

Surrounding text surrounding text surrounding text surrounding text

The ’@lisp’ and ’@smalllisp’ Commands

The @lisp and @smalllisp commands are really just special cases of @example and @smallexample, respectively.

The generated HTML for these commands is:
<div class="lisp"><pre class="lisp"> ... </pre></div>
  and
<div class="smalllisp"><pre class="smalllisp"> ... </pre></div>

;;This is lisp. (example from an online tutorial at Simon Fraser U.).
;; Triple the value of a number
(defun triple (X)
  "Compute three times X."  ; Inline comments can
  (* 3 X))                  ; be placed here.
;; Negate the sign of a number
(defun negate (X)
  "Negate the value of X."  ; This is a documentation string.
  (- X))                
;;This is smalllisp.
;; Triple the value of a number
(defun triple (X)
  "Compute three times X."  ; Inline comments can
  (* 3 X))                  ; be placed here.
;; Negate the sign of a number
(defun negate (X)
  "Negate the value of X."  ; This is a documentation string.
  (- X))                



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Display Commands

The ’@display Command

The @display block has the following characteristics:

  1. block is left-indented
  2. block inherits the font family and font size from the enclosing environment
  3. line break and whitespace formatting are retained as written
  4. embedded Texinfo commands are expanded

Compliance:
Output to ’info’ document: as specified
Output to ’HTML’ document: as specified EXCEPT as noted below

The generated HTML for these commands are:
<div class="display"><pre class="display"> ... </pre></div>
  and
<div class="smalldisplay"><pre class="smalldisplay"> ... </pre><div>

PLEASE NOTE: The HTML seems to be unnecessarily complex because the ’display’ and ’smalldisplay’ classes are themselves defined as ’pre’ making the <pre...> tag redundant.
See also discussion of the @exdent command: (see exdent issues).
PLEASE NOTE: The documentation says that the @display block delimiters do not generate a line of output. This is true in the ’info’ output but the HTML output generates a blank line before the block because the <div> and <pre> classes are defined on successive lines. This means that constructing ’correct’ formatting for info output is ’incorrect’ for HTML output.

When encouraging a shark to eat from your hand, be sure to have 
      a paramedic 
        AND
      a psychiatrist 
standing by for an immediate debriefing regarding the defective contents 
of your skull structure. 

The ’@smalldisplay Command

The @smalldisplay is the same as @display above except that the font size is smaller.

When encouraging a shark to eat from your hand, be sure to have 
      a paramedic 
        AND
      a psychiatrist 
standing by for an immediate debriefing regarding the defective contents 
of your skull structure. 



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Format Commands

The ’@format’ Command

The @format block has the following characteristics:

  1. block is not indented
  2. block inherits the font family and font size from the enclosing environment
  3. line break and whitespace formatting are retained as written
  4. embedded Texinfo commands are expanded

Compliance:
Output to ’info’ document: as specified
Output to ’HTML’ document: as specified EXCEPT as noted below

The generated HTML for these commands are:
<div class="format"><pre class="format"> ... </pre><div>
  and
<div class="smallformat"><pre class="smallformat"> ... </pre><div>

PLEASE NOTE: The HTML seems to be unnecessarily complex because the ’format’ and ’smallformat’ classes are themselves defined as ’pre’ making the <pre...> tag redundant.
PLEASE NOTE: The documentation says that the @format block delimiters do not generate a line of output. This is true in the ’info’ output but the HTML output generates a blank line before the block because the <div> and <pre> classes are defined on successive lines. This means that constructing ’correct’ formatting for info output is ’incorrect’ for HTML output.

When encouraging a shark to eat from your hand, be sure to have 
      a paramedic 
        AND
      a psychiatrist 
standing by for an immediate debriefing regarding the defective contents 
of your skull structure. 

The ’@smallformat’ Command

The @smallformat is the same as @format above except that the font size is smaller.

When encouraging a shark to eat from your hand, be sure to have 
      a paramedic 
        AND
      a psychiatrist 
standing by for an immediate debriefing regarding the defective contents 
of your skull structure. 



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Verbatim Command

The ’@verbatim’ Command

The @verbatim’ block command is similar to the @format block command above, but carefully note the differences when choosing which one to use.

The @verbatim block has the following characteristics:

  1. block is not indented
  2. font family is not inherited; instead, a fixed-width font is used.
  3. line break and whitespace formatting are retained as written
  4. embedded Texinfo commands are not expanded, but are written as plain text.

Compliance:
Output to ’info’ document: as specified
Output to ’HTML’ document: as specified EXCEPT as noted below

The generated HTML for this command is:
<pre class="verbatim"> ... </pre>

PLEASE NOTE: In the HTML output, the font size is reduced to the page default, which we believe is a bug caused by the font-size being inherited from the wrong place. What this means is that without the application of CSS style, the full-sized @verbatim example and the @smallformat+@verbatim example use the same font size.
Ooops!


This is Verbatim body text: with whitespace and line breaks preformatted.
Note that @code{} block command below IS NOT processed.

If    cows    can    @code{jump}    over    the    moon, 
   then    what    do    sheep    jump    over?


The ’@smallformat’ + ’@verbatim’ Command

Note that there is no ’@smallverbatim’ command (it’s an oxymoron); however, the same effect can be achieved by enclosing the ’verbatim’ block within a ’smallformat’ block.

The generated HTML for this command is:
<div class="smallformat"><pre class="verbatim"> ... </pre></div>



This is small Verbatim body text: with whitespace and line breaks preformatted.
Note that @code{} block command below IS NOT processed.

If    cows    can    @code{jump}    over    the    moon, 
   then    what    do    sheep    jump    over?



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Misc Block Modifiers

The ’@flushleft’ Command

Rather than justifying the text, (spreading it across the full width of the line), text is set flush with the left margin.

This is presumably to prevent justification in outputs that support it. Note that neither ’info’ output nor HTML output justify text, but for HTML, the enclosing environment may be ’centered’ or some other format, so the @flushleft command overrides the parent environment. @flushleft has no function in the ’info’ output.

Generated HTML: <p align="left"> ... </p>

When I left home for the first time, I took with me all the treasures of a magical youth: three toy soldiers, a bag of cat’s-eye marbles, my dad’s Scout knife, a clean handkerchief, $3.73 and my teddybear, Beathan.



The ’@flushright’ Command

Text is set flush with the right margin.

As the documentation shows, this is useful for setting a return address or other paragraph to align with the right margin. The @flushright implies pre-formatting of the text except for the edge alignment.

PLEASE NOTE: Because @flushright implies pre-formatting of lines in the ’info’ output, long lines (that would otherwise have wrapped), may not appear as right-aligned.
In the HTML output, if the paragraph’s environment would normally wrap, then it is correctly converted to flush-right (with wrapping); however, explicitly pre-formatted HTML output will override the @flushright command.

PLEASE NOTE: Related to the above is the fact that outside an environment, the info output for @flushright is seen as preformatted text (no explicit line breaks necessary). However, the HTML output for this will not be seen as preformatted; therefore, explicit line breaks will be necessary. Thus, info and HTML output are visually incompatible.

If you are generating HTML output, we would recommend that you avoid using the @flushright command because beautification would require specific manual modification to the HTML markkup.

Outside an environment (with and without explicit line breaks):
Generated HTML: <p align="right"> ... </p>

Jungle, George of the
Ape Mountain, South
Bukubu Territory
Deepest Africa


Jungle, George of the Ape Mountain, South Bukubu Territory Deepest Africa

Direct HTML Output for pre-formatted, right-aligned text: Jungle, George of the Ape Mountain, South Bukubu Territory Deepest Africa

In an @example environment:
Generated HTML: (see chapter for ’example’ blocks)

Jungle, George of the 
Ape Mountain, South
Bukubu Territory
Deepest Africa

Outside an environment: Generated HTML: (<p align="right"> ... </p>)

When I left home for the first time, I took with me all the treasures of a magical youth: three toy soldiers, a bag of cat’s-eye marbles, my dad’s Scout knife, a clean handkerchief, $3.73 and my teddybear, Beathan.

In an @example environment:
Generated HTML: (see chapter for ’example’ blocks)

When I left home for the first time, I took with me all the treasures of a 
magical youth: three toy soldiers, a bag of cat's-eye marbles, my dad's 
Scout knife, a clean handkerchief, $3.73 and my teddybear, Beathan.

In an @indentedblock environment:
Generated HTML: <div class="indentedblock"><p align="right"> ... </p></div>

When I left home for the first time, I took with me all the treasures of a magical youth: three toy soldiers, a bag of cat’s-eye marbles, my dad’s Scout knife, a clean handkerchief, $3.73 and my teddybear, Beathan.



The ’@raggedright’ Command

This command applies only to output formats that can ’justify’ i.e. spread text to fill the line. Text is left-justified (indented if specified), but leaving the right margin ragged.

@raggedright does not apply to ’info’ and HTML output, where text should be written as ordinary paragraph text.

Generated HTML: (no HTML generated)

PLEASE NOTE: The paragraph below is not present at all in the HTML output; however, it should be written to the HTML output as ordinary paragraph text.

- - - MISSING HTML PARAGRAPH - - -

- - - MISSING HTML PARAGRAPH - - -



The ’@cartouche’ Command

For output formats that support it, the paragraph within a @cartouche{ ... } sequence is enclosed within a border.
Generated HTML: <table class="cartouche" border="1">
                <tbody><tr><td><p> ... </p></td></tr></tbody></table>
Even thought the genenerated HTML is vastly more complex and fragile than it needs to be, it works by leveraging the definition for the <table> tag, which in earlier versions of HTML was the only element that was allowed to have borders.

The HTML output for the following paragraph is enclosed within a border:

Even though the generated HTML does not define the ’cartouche’ class, the enclosing border is still drawn. Be aware, however, that the generated code explicitly invokes the HTML attribute: border="1", which overrides the class definition in ’infodoc-styles.css’. Modern HTML uses CSS to set the border attributes, so by default, the ’idpp’ post processor removes this obsolete syntax, allowing the ’cartouche’ class to take control of the styling.
For details, see the ’table.cartouche’ class in ’infodoc-styles.css’.



The ’@exdent’ Command

The @exdent command removes indentation for the current text line, shifting the line to begin at the left margin. Frankly, we can’t find a use for this, but it exists, so it should work correctly.

The @exdent command is logically useful only within the following block types: @example and @display. In the output, these block types are indented and pre-formatted.

@example block
unmodified line
exdented line
unmodified line
@display block
unmodified line
exdented line
unmodified line

Other block types either use automatic line breaks and/or are already positioned at the left margin. As of Texinfo version 5.2, the @exdent command is also (inappropriately) recognized within @quotation blocks and @indentedblock blocks where it successfully shifts the line to the left margin BUT unfortunately, this prevents the line from being automatically line wrapped.

@quotation block
When I left home for the first time, I took with me all the

treasures of a magical youth: three toy soldiers, a bag of cat’s-eye marbles, my dad’s

Scout knife, a clean handkerchief, $3.73 and my teddybear, Beathan.

@indentedblock block
When I left home for the first time, I took with me all the

treasures of a magical youth: three toy soldiers, a bag of cat’s-eye marbles, my dad’s

Scout knife, a clean handkerchief, $3.73 and my teddybear, Beathan.

PLEASE NOTE: The texi-to-HTML converter SHOULD ignore all instances of the @exdent command; however, the texi-to-HTML converter IS processing @exdent (but not well), with each line of the paragraph being treated as a separate paragraph (double-spaced AND without an exdented line). This problem has been discussed with the Texinfo group, and possible HTML support for the @exdent command in @example and @display blocks is under consideration



The ’@indent’ and ’@noindent’ Commands

These commands apply only to text which is outside any block environment. However, the Texinfo documentation on this is unclear.

Note also that the global document command @paragraphindent must be set to allow indenting of the first line of paragraphs in order for these commands to be recognized. First-line indentation is not enabled for this document; however, you can temporarily enable it by setting the global @paragraphindent 3 to view indentation.

The @indent and @noindent commands do not apply to the HTML output.

Applying @indent

When I left home for the first time, I took with me all the treasures of a magical youth: three toy soldiers, a bag of cat’s-eye marbles, my dad’s Scout knife, a clean handkerchief, $3.73 and my teddybear, Beathan.

Applying @noindent

When I left home for the first time, I took with me all the treasures of a magical youth: three toy soldiers, a bag of cat’s-eye marbles, my dad’s Scout knife, a clean handkerchief, $3.73 and my teddybear, Beathan.



The ’@w{}’ Command

Text within a @w{ ... } command block is protected from automatic line breaks. This is useful for ensuring that a certain phrase will be displayed entirely on one line, or that the line break will happen only where you specify. For both the ’info’ output and the HTML output, the phrase will be displayed antirely on the line where it begins OR if it would extend beyond the margin, the entire phrase would be moved to the next line.

The HTML code generated for this command can take one of two forms, based on the complexity of the text in the sequence:

For a simple text sequence, space characters (U+000020) may simply be replaced by the HTML definition: &nbsp; (non-breaking-space), as in the following:
"Extremely&nbsp;Loud&nbsp;and&nbsp;Incredibly&nbsp;Close"<!-- /@w -->

For a more complex text sequence, the ’nolinebreak’ class will be called out:
<span class="nolinebreak"> ... </span><!-- /@w -->

For example, you may want to enclose a phrase such as "all-you-can-eat, only $5.99!" to ensure that it is displayed all on the same line.

In either case, the font within the block will be the same as the 
surrounding text (and the unnecessary HTML comment will be ignored).
Note also that it would be unwise to make any assumptions about which 
HTML construct above will be generated by a particular text sequence.
Please note that there is a long-standing bug in the ’makeinfo’ 
utility which fails to wrap a @w{ ... } command block if it 
crosses the margin of the ’info’ output. This bug was introduced 
when makeinfo was converted from ’C’ to Perl and is present at 
least up to version 5.2. This bug has been reported, and we 
believe that the problem has been corrected in the code base and 
that the update will be part of the next major release.


The ’@allowcodebreaks’ Command

This command controls automatic insertion of line breaks at hyphenation points (’-’ and ’_’) within a ’@code’ (or similar) block, and affects only TeX and HTML output. Note that for ’info’ format, data inside a @code block is seen as pre-formatted and is not subject to line breaks.

With ’@allowcodebreaks false’, the generated HTML for a code block is:
<code><span class="nocodebreak"> ... </span></code>
With ’@allowcodebreaks true’, the generated HTML for a code block is:
<code></code>

Code breaks off: text beyond browser’s right edge is not wrapped:
abcdefg-hijklmn-opqrstu-vwxyz_abcdefg-hijklmn-opqrstu-vwxyz_abcdefg-hijklmn-opqrstu-vwxyz_abcdefg-hijklmn-opqrstu-vwxyz


Code breaks on: text beyond browser’s right edge (or edge of container) is wrapped:
abcdefg-hijklmn-opqrstu-vwxyz_abcdefg-hijklmn-opqrstu-vwxyz_abcdefg-hijklmn-opqrstu-vwxyz_abcdefg-hijklmn-opqrstu-vwxyz




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Comparison Chart

This chart compares the formatting characteristics of the various Texinfo block-oriented commands. The variable factors are:

  1. Indentation
    Blocks may be indented on the left, on both right and left, or unindented.
  2. Font Family and Font Size (HTML output)
    The font family and font size are either inherited from the parent block, (generally sans-serif) or are directly specified as part of block’s definition.
  3. Formatting
    The contents of the block are formatted according to the block’s definition:
    • automatically wrap lines and compress whitespace
    • retain preformatted line breaks and whitespace
  4. Texinfo Command Expansion
    Texinfo commands are expanded (interpreted as commands) EXCEPT in @verbatim blocks.
COMMANDL-INDENTR-INDENTFONTFORMATTING@commands
quotationyesyesinheritedautomaticexpand
indentedblockyesnoinheritedautomaticexpand
exampleyesnomonospacepreformattedexpand
displayyesnoinheritedpreformattedexpand
formatnonoinheritedpreformattedexpand
verbatimnonomonospacepreformattedas text


The @lisp and @smalllisp block environments are simply special cases of @example, and so are not included in the table.

Note that only ’info’ and ’HTML’ output formats are considered here. Output to Tex, PDF, Docbook, XML and others are not addressed in this test document.




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Table and Multitable

The ’@table’ Command

A two-column table with the ’@samp’ attribute for the first column.
Note that the @ftable and @vtable commands produce the same display, but also automatically create indices for each entry.

Compliance:
Output to ’info’ document: as specified
Output to ’HTML’ document: as specified EXCEPT as noted below

The generated HTML for this command is:

<dl compact="compact">
 <dt>&lsquo;<samp>COL1_DATA</samp>&rsquo;</dt>
 <dt>&lsquo;<samp>COL1_DATA</samp>&rsquo;</dt>
 <dd><p>COL2_DATA</p></dd>
 <dt>&lsquo;<samp>COL1_DATA</samp>&rsquo;</dt>
 <dd><p>COL2_DATA</p></dd>
</dl>

In HTML4, this is called a ’definition list’, while in HTML5, 
this is called a ’description list’. Either way, the browser’s 
default formatting is likely the same
for
while

loop while the condition evaluates to ’true’

if

execute once if the condition evaluates to ’true’



Please note that the above table looks rather bad in ’info’ format and looks terrible in unstyled HTML. For this reason, we recommend that you consider building all your tables using the @multitable command described below.

PLEASE NOTE: If you must use the @table command, we strongly recommend the use of ’infodoc-styles.css’ which redefines the <dl> tag so the HTML ouput is visually much nearer to the ’info’ output.



The ’@multitable’ Command

Compliance:
Output to ’info’ document: as specified
Output to ’HTML’ document: as specified EXCEPT as noted below

The generated HTML for this command is:

<table>
 <thead><tr><th>aaaaa</th><th>bbbbb</th><th>ccccc</th></tr></thead>
 <tr><td>aaaaa</td><td>bbbbb</td><td>ccccc</td></tr>
 <tr><td>aaaaa</td><td>bbbbb</td><td>ccccc</td></tr>
 <tr><td>aaaaa</td><td>bbbbb</td><td>ccccc</td></tr>
</table>

This example is of a simple three(3) column multitable which 
includes a @headitem (column headings) sub-command. 
’aaaaa’ represents data in first column, ’bbbbb’ is the second 
column and ’ccccc’ is the third column.


AnimalCohortExample Sentence
cowPlacentalThe cow jumped over the fence.
horsePlacentalThe horse eats flowers and grass.
wombatMarsupialThe wonderful wombat can’t jump, but seems quite happy!


Note that the output looks quite different in ’info’ format and HTML format, primarily because of column spacing, fixed versus monospace font, line-break points and underlining of ’info’ column headings. Some of these differences rise to the level of bugs.

There is no guarantee that all tables in a document will want the same formatting, so simply defining a table style in our CSS definition file will not solve all the possible formatting problems; however, as an intermediate goal, our definition of the <table> element produces HTML tables that more closely resemble the ’info’ tables.

PLEASE NOTE: Column spacing within the HTML output of a multitable is not handled well. The whitespace specified in the ’texi’ source and displayed correctly in the ’info’ output is ignored for the HTML output (whitespace sequences are compressed to a single space).

Note that this is handled by our redefinition of the HTML <table> element, but can possibly be addressed directly by the texi-to-HTML converter.

For a more complex example of a multitable, please see the chapter See Comparison Chart.




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Font Modification

The Smallcaps ’@sc’ Command

IN THE ’INFO’ OUTPUT, THE TEXT IS SIMPLY CONVERTED TO UPPERCASE; WHILE THE HTML OUTPUT IS SPECIFIED AS UPPERCASE, BUT IN A SMALLER FONT SIZE.

The generated HTML for this command is:
<p><small> ... </small></p>

The Texinfo documentation suggests that smallcaps be avoided due to inconsistencies across output formats.

The Emphasis ’@emph’ Command

The @emph command delimits the text with underscore characters in ’info’ output. The HTML output is italicized.

The generated HTML for this command is:
<p><em> ... </em></p>

Note that the actual appearance of the <em> ... </em> block in the HTML output is dependent on the number of ancestor levels, but this should seldom be an issue when generating the HTML from ’texi’ source.

The Strong ’@strong’ Command

The @strong command delimits the text with asterisk characters in the ’info’ output. The HTML output is in bold and in contrast with surrounding text.

The generated HTML for this command is:
<p><strong> ... </strong></p>

The Texinfo documentation suggests that @strong be used seldom and carefully due to possible mis-interpretation as a cross-reference.

Editorial Note: Both ’@emph’ and ’@strong’ unfortunately look like crap in the ’info’ output, but are relatively cool in the HTML output.



Miscellaneous Font-modification Commands

The following commands specify modifications to the basic text font. These are used by printed (i.e. typeset) documents and by the HTML output. They are ignored for the info-format output.

@b command - Bold text. (generated HTML uses <b> ... </b>)
   Text within a ’@b’ sequence.

@i command - Italic text. (generated HTML uses <i> ... </i>)
   Text within a ’@i’ sequence.

@r command - Roman font family.
(generated HTML uses <span class="roman"> ... </span>)
The font size is inappropriately reduced, but this is compensated by application of CSS definition file.
   Text within a ’@r’ sequence.

@t command - Fixed-width (typewriter) font family
(generated HTML uses <tt> ... </tt>)
The font size is inappropriately reduced, but this is compensated by application of CSS definition file.
   Text within a '@t' sequence.

Please note that the <tt> tag is no longer supported in HTML5,
but is explicitly defined in infodoc-styles.css.

@sansserif command - Sans serif font family

Examples: Default text:
(generated HTML uses <p> ... </p>)
   Friends, Romans, Countrymen! Lend me your pen!

Roman text with serif.
(generated HTML uses <span class="roman"> ... </span>)
   Friends, Romans, Countrymen! Lend me your golf clubs!

Roman text without serif.
(generated HTML uses <span class="roman"><span class="sansserif"> ... </span></span>)
   Friends, Romans, Countrymen! Lend me your car!

Fixed-width text with serif.
(generated HTML uses <tt> ... </tt>)
Font size is inappropriately reduced here also.
   Friends, Romans, Countrymen! Lend me your beach house!

Fixed-width text without serif.
(generated HTML uses <tt><span class="sansserif"> ... </span></tt>)
Font size is inappropriately reduced here also.
   Friends, Romans, Countrymen! Lend me your spouse!


@slanted command - Slanted text

Examples: Slanted Roman text.
(generated HTML uses <span class="roman"><i> ... </i></span>)
The font size is inappropriately reduced, but this is compensated by application of CSS definition file.
   Friends, Romans, Countrymen! Lend me your phone!

Slanted Fixed-width text.
(generated HTML uses <tt><i> ... </i></tt>)
The font size is inappropriately reduced, but this is compensated by application of CSS definition file.
   Friends, Romans, Countrymen! Lend me your ATM card!




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Object Indicators

This is a list of object-identifier commands from the Texinfo documentation. Most of these commands are supported using standard HTML tags. If the browser’s default for these does not satisfy, then please see the stubs in ’infodoc-styles.css’ for explicitly defining these elements.

Those identifiers which are directly supported by auto-generated style definitions are so indicated.

@code: Indicate text that is a literal example of a piece of a program.
Supported by  : HTML tag
Generated HTML: <p><code> ... </code></p>

@samp: ‘Indicate text that is a literal example of a character sequence.
Supported by  : HTML tag
Generated HTML: <p><samp> ... </samp></p>

@var : Indicate a metasyntactic variable.
Supported by  : HTML tag
Generated HTML: <p><var> ... </var></p>

@cite: Indicate the name of a book.
Supported by  : HTML tag
Generated HTML: <p><cite> ... </cite></p>

@abbr: Indicate an abbreviation.
Supported by  : HTML tag
Generated HTML: <p><abbr> ... </abbr></p>
A useful trick is to use the 'title' attribute with the <abbr> tag
to expand an abbreviation on mouse-over: Please support the FSF.

@kbd : Indicate keyboard input.
Supported by  : auto-generated: kbd {font-style:oblique}
Generated HTML: <p><kbd> ... </kbd></p>

(Please note that the <kbd> tag is a standard HTML          )
(tag, and does not need the converter's explicit definition.)

@env : Indicate an environment variable.
Supported by  : none
Generated HTML: <p><code> ... </code></p>

@file: Indicate the name of a file.
Supported by  : none
Generated HTML: <p><samp> ... </samp></p>

@command: Indicate the name of a command.
Supported by  : none
Generated HTML: <p><code> ... </code></p>

@option: Indicate a command-line option.
Supported by  : none
Generated HTML: <p><samp> ... </samp></p>

@dfn : Indicate the introductory or defining use of a term.
Supported by  : none
Generated HTML: <p><em> ... </em></p>

(Please note that the <dfn> tag is a standard HTML)
(tag, and does not need the <em> substitution.    )

@verb: Write a verbatim sequence of characters.
Supported by  : none
Generated HTML: <p><tt> ... </tt></p>

(Please note that the <tt> tag is no longer supported in HTML5,)
(but is explicitly defined in infodoc-styles.css. See <code>.)

@key : Indicate the conventional name for a key on a keyboard.
Supported by  : none ("key" class not defined)
Generated HTML: <p><tt class="key"> ... </tt></p>

(Please note that the 'key' sub-class of <tt> is )
(also explicitly defined in infodoc-styles.css.)

@acronym: Indicate an acronym.
Supported by  : none
Generated HTML: <p><acronym> ... </acronym></p>

(Please note that the <acronym> tag is no longer supported in HTML5,)
(but is explicitly defined in infodoc-styles.css. See <abbr>.     )

@indicateurl: ‘Indicate an example (nonfunctional) URL
(Use @url command for live URLs.)
Supported by  : none
Generated HTML: <p> ... </p>

@email: Indicate an electronic mail address.
Supported by  : none
Generated HTML: <p><a href="mailto:xxxx> ... </a></p>
(where ’xxxx’ is the email address)

PLEASE NOTE: The following object identifiers inappropriately use the default HTML page font (extremely small):
@kbd, @env, @file, @command, @option, @verb, @key, @indicateurl
All of these are compensated by applying ’infodoc-styles.css’.




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InfoMenu Structure

Menus are at the core of organizing a Texinfo document. Menus in ’info’ format are simply a list of hyperlinks to various nodes (chapters) within the document. For the ’info’ output, each item in a menu consists of a bullet (asterisk character), a @xref (hyperlink) and an optional description of the link content.

Menus as constructed in the HTML output use a <table> structure to implement the same functionality. The HTML code block below was generated for the ’List Commands’ chapter of this document.

<table class="menu" border="0" cellspacing="0">
   <tr>
      <td align="left" valign="top">&bull; 
         <a href="#Itemized-Lists" accesskey="1">Itemized Lists</a>:
      </td>
      <td>&nbsp;&nbsp;</td>
      <td align="left" valign="top">Test –html option &rsquo;itemize&rsquo; list output
      </td>
   </tr>
   <tr>
      <td align="left" valign="top">&bull;
         <a href="#Enumerated-Lists" accesskey="2">Enumerated Lists</a>:
      </td>
      <td>&nbsp;&nbsp;</td>
      <td align="left" valign="top">Test –html option &rsquo;enumerate&rsquo; list output
      </td>
   </tr>
</table>

There are two pre-defined styles generated by the texi-to-HTML converter:
  pre.menu-comment {font-family: serif} and
  pre.menu-preformatted {font-family: serif}
Neither of these is actually used in normal HTML output. We have been told that they may be invoked under very special circumstances, but we have not been able to generate a test that invokes them.
Instead, the ’menu’ class is invoked: <table class="menu"> to create menus. This class is not defined in the generated HTML, but the browser uses its default table definitions for the elements within the table. This seems to work without problems in the raw HTML output, but note that we re-define the <table> element in ’infodoc-styles.css’ to support the @multitable command, so we must also define the the ’menu’ class. This is both more reliable and easier to customize than simply relying on the browser defaults.




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InfoTOC Structure

Although the default info-format document does not include a Table of Contents, the HTML version of the document does.

The HTML document’s Table of Contents consists of a multi-level, un-ordered list which provides links to all the chapters in the document.

What follows is an example taken from the HTML version of the document you are now reading.

<div class="contents">

<ul class="no-bullet">
  <li><a name="toc-Overview-1" href="#Overview">Overview</a></li>
  <li><a name="toc-CSS-Definition-File-1" href="#CSS-Definition-File">CSS Definition File</a>
  <ul class="no-bullet">
    <li><a name="toc-Summary-of-CSS-Definitions-1" href="#Summary-of-CSS-Definitions">Summary of CSS Definitions</a></li>
    <li><a name="toc-Applying-the-CSS-Definitions-1" href="#Applying-the-CSS-Definitions">Applying the CSS Definitions</a></li>
    <li><a name="toc-Adjusting-Style-Definitions-1" href="#Adjusting-Style-Definitions">Adjusting Style Definitions</a></li>
  </ul></li>
  <li><a name="toc-HTML-Post_002dprocessing-1" href="#HTML-Post_002dprocessing">HTML Post-processing</a>
  . . .
  </ul></li>
  . . .
</ul>
</div>


With the exception of the stub definition of the ’no-bullet’ class described above, the entire Table of Contents relies on the browser’s default settings to render it in the window. In the browsers used for our testing (see browsers used for testing), the output actually looks great with no post-processing at all. However, the ’infodoc-styles.css’ CSS definition file fully defines the ’no-bullet’, ’contents’ and ’contents-heading’ classes for safety, and defines additional classes for customization of the Table of Contents. The following post-processing options are also available for Table of Contents customization or removal, respectively.
See idpp -c option.
See idpp -r option.





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Misc Formatting

No misc. formatting tests identified at this time.




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Idpp Testing

Automatic post-processor parsing, and document-modification tests.

Because scanning automatically-generated HTML markup is a complex process, and because even a small difference in the expected formatting can cause the post-processor to choke, the following tests provide a broad sample of the markup that may be generated by the Texinfo texi-to-HTML converter.




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Idpp List Processing

The following are lists nested inside other lists which exercises the ’idpp’ list-recursion algorithm.

@enumerate nested within @enumerate

  1. Nested Enumerate (a)
    The HTML for this list should be post-processed with (a)
    New Boots
    1. There once was a man from Nantucket
    2. Who always peed into a bucket
    3. Till one day, he missed
    4. And his boots got all pissed,
    5. And shouted "Now I’ll have to wash them!"
  2. Nested Enumerate (A)
    The HTML for the following list should be post-processed with (A)
    Old Wife
    1. There once was a man from Poughkeepsie
    2. Who often got rather tipsy.
    3. He was roundly ashamed;
    4. Twas his wife that he blamed,
    5. For she was quite prone to be ditzy.

@itemize nested within @enumerate

Note that the browser’s rendering engine will determine that the following itemized (<ul>) lists are nested, and will automagically convert the list to level-down bullets:

disc bullets    become  circle bullets
circle bullets  become  square bullets
square bullets  remain  square bullets

To prevent this automatic modification, it will be necessary to trick the browser by using bullet characters that it cannot convert — which is not as easy as it sounds (see simulated disc-bullet list below) ==OR== assign a specific bullet-type class.

  1. Nested Itemize @bullet(•)
       The HTML for the following list should not need post-processing,
       but the browser sees that it is nested and automagically converts 
       the ’disc’ bullets to (level-down) ’circle’ bullets. 
       (See note above and simulated disc-bullet list below.)
       

    "Your Love" from: "The One Where Monica Gets a New Roommate"

    • Love is sweet as summer showers,
      Love is a wondrous work of art.
    • But your love, oh your love, your love
      is like a giant pigeon, crapping on my heart.
  2. Nested Itemize @w{} with simulated disc bullets(•)
       Although there are at least seven children born during the 
       series, this one occurred during the birth of Ross’ son Ben.
       

    "Babies" from "The One With the Birth"

    • ⚫ They're tiny and chubby and so sweet to touch
        Soon they'll grow up and resent you so much
    • ⚫ Now they're yelling at you and you don't know why
        And you cry and you cry and you cry
    • ⚫ And you cry and you cry...
  3. Nested Itemize @textdegree(°)
    The HTML for the following list should be post-processed with (⚬).
    "Crazy Underwear" from: "The One With Ross’s Thing"
    • Crazy underwear,
      creepin up my butt.
    • Crazy underwear,
      Always in a rut.
    • Crazy underwear...
  4. Nested Itemize @minus(-)
       This is a three-level itemized list, and the HTML for 
       all levels should be post-processed with (▪) bullets.
       "Smelly Cat" from "The One With the Baby On the Bus, et al"
       
    • Smelly cat, smelly cat
      What are they feeding you?
    • Smelly cat, smelly cat
      It’s not your fault
      • They won’t take you to the vet
        You’re obviously not their favorite pet.
      • You may not be a bed of roses
        And you’re no friend to those with noses.
    • Smelly cat, smelly cat
      What are they feeding you?
    • Smelly cat, smelly cat
      It’s not your fault

@itemize nested within @itemize

@enumerate nested within @itemize

Deeply Nested Lists

  1. Itemized Below Enumerated (disc bullet)
    "Sticky Shoes" from "The One With Phoebe’s Ex-partner"
    • My favorite shoes, so good to me
      I wear them every day.
    • Down at the heel, holes in the toe
      Don’t care what people say.
    • My feet’s best friend, pals to the end
      with them I’m one hot chickie
    • Thought late one night, not much light
      I stepped in something icky...

      Enumerated Below Itemized (decimal leading-zero)

      1. Sticky shoes, sticky shoes
        Always make me smile.
      2. Sticky shoes, sticky shoes
        Next time, I’ll avoid the pile!
  2. All Hail, Phoebe Buffay!



Lyrics in this section copyright (c) NBC / Warner Bros. Television.
(but the limericks are our fault :-)



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Idpp Block Processing

Lists Inside Blocks

Formatted constructs such as @enumerate (<ol>) lists, @itemize (<ul>) lists or other formatted constructs should usually be built outside any other block construct, or what the Texinfo documentation refers to as an "environment."

Placing one formatted construct (such as a list) inside another formatted environment is not recommended due to likely formatting conflicts.

The native ’.info’ output for such constructs is surprisingly good; however, converting these constructs in your Texinfo source to non-native formats can be a technically difficult task, and in the case of the texi-to-HTML converter, can yield some very disappointing results.

For this reason we urge caution when placing formatted (non-paragraph) data inside a formatted block environment. These environments are:

This discussion does not apply to @verbatim environments because all contents of a @verbatim environment are output as plain text.

For a detailed description of block environments,
please see Comparison Chart.


@indentedblock

The @indentedblock environment is not preformatted, and so may contain any other construct without difficulty. This is the environment recommended for all formatted constructs that must be built inside an environment.

Here we are inside an @indentedblock block.

  1. Bathe.
  2. Brush your teeth.
  3. Shave unwanted hair.
  4. Eat a healthful breakfast.
  5. Pack your bag.
  6. Kiss all family members.
  7. Go to work.

Leaving the @indentedblock block.


@display block

The ’info’ document for the following blocks looks surprisingly good; however, the texi-to-HTML converter generates some rather tortured HTML inside blocks that are defined as "preformatted."

If the block-definition classes called out by the generated HTML are not defined, then the HTML looks fairly ok because the class callouts are ignored. When the classes ARE defined, however, the weakness of the auto-generated code becomes obvious. Without post-processing, the following lists are unreadable.

Although ’idpp’ is not able to parse the tortured HTML of these lists themselves (it would require a second pass), it does automatically repair the worst of the formatting problems.

If you want professionally formatted lists, then the correct answer is:
     DON’T PUT LISTS INSIDE PRE-FORMATTED BLOCK ENVIRONMENTS!!


This is a preformatted block containing an itemized list and an enumerated list.

Here we are inside a @display block.
  1. Bathe.
  2. Brush your teeth.
  3. Shave unwanted hair.
  4. Eat a healthful breakfast.
  5. Pack your bag.
  6. Kiss all family members.
  7. Go to work.
Leaving the @display block.

The raw HTML markup generated for this sequence

<div class="display">
<pre class="display">Here we are inside a @display block.
</pre><ul>
<li> <pre class="display">Bathe.
</pre></li><li> <pre class="display">Brush your teeth.
</pre></li><li> <pre class="display">Shave unwanted hair.
</pre></li><li> <pre class="display">Eat a healthful breakfast.
</pre></li><li> <pre class="display">Pack your bag.
</pre></li><li> <pre class="display">Kiss all family members.
</pre></li><li> <pre class="display">Go to work.
</pre></li></ul>
<pre class="display">
</pre><ol>
<li> <pre class="display">Bathe.
</pre></li><li> <pre class="display">Brush your teeth.
</pre></li><li> <pre class="display">Shave unwanted hair.
</pre></li><li> <pre class="display">Eat a healthful breakfast.
</pre></li><li> <pre class="display">Pack your bag.
</pre></li><li> <pre class="display">Kiss all family members.
</pre></li><li> <pre class="display">Go to work.
</pre></li></ol>
<pre class="display">Leaving the @display block.
</pre></div>

The same sequence after post-processing

Note that the extra ' <pre class...>' and '</pre> tags associated with individual line items have been removed. For consistency, the '<pre></pre>' tags outside the lists are ignored.

<div class="display"><pre class="display">Here we are inside a @display block.
</pre><ul>
<li>Bathe.
</li><li>Brush your teeth.
</li><li>Shave unwanted hair.
</li><li>Eat a healthful breakfast.
</li><li>Pack your bag.
</li><li>Kiss all family members.
</li><li>Go to work.
</li></ul>
<pre class="display">
</pre><ol>
<li>Bathe.
</li><li>Brush your teeth.
</li><li>Shave unwanted hair.
</li><li>Eat a healthful breakfast.
</li><li>Pack your bag.
</li><li>Kiss all family members.
</li><li>Go to work.
</li></ol>
<pre class="display">Leaving the @display block.
</pre></div>

@example block

Here is another type of preformatted block containing an itemized list and an enumerated list. This block is the same as the previous block except that it is defined to use a monospace font. The post-processing for the block is identical.

Here we are inside an @example block.
  1. Bathe.
  2. Brush your teeth.
  3. Shave unwanted hair.
  4. Eat a healthful breakfast.
  5. Pack your bag.
  6. Kiss all family members.
  7. Go to work.

Leaving the @example block.



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Idpp Misc Tests

@quotation and @smallquotation with ’author’ Attached

Correct is better than fast. Simple is better than complex.
Clear is better than cute. Safe is better than insecure.
Sutter and Alexandrescu, C++ Coding Standards

A designer knows he has achieved perfection not when there is nothing left to add, but when there is nothing left to take away.
Antoine de Saint-Exupery


Blocks Inside Blocks

Except for @indentedblock blocks (and possibly @quotation blocks), it is strongly recommended that block environments NOT be nested within other block environments, but we run a few tests here, just to see what happens. (Note that ’idpp’ handles these tests smoothly :)

Remember that preformatted data including other preformatted blocks
should not be nested inside preformatted blocks — unless you LIKE ugly.

@indentedblock within @indentedblock block

This text is part of the outer indented block. It should be indented by a few spaces as specified by the document’s @exampleindent command (5 spaces by default in info output).

This is a doubly-indented paragraph, i.e. it lives within a nested @indentedblock. This is a bit unlikely is a production document, but we want to see how makeinfo handles it for info-format and HTML-format output.

This text is part of the outer indented block. It should be indented by a few spaces as specified by the document’s @exampleindent command (5 spaces by default in info output).

@example within @indentedblock block

This text is part of the outer indented block. It should be indented by a few spaces as specified by the document’s @exampleindent command (5 spaces by default in info output).

This text is within an @example block (monospaced text).
It can often be useful to change font families for emphasis.

This text is part of the outer indented block. It should be indented by a few spaces as specified by the document’s @exampleindent command (5 spaces by default in info output).

Simple @quotation block with @author

"Give a man a fish, and he’ll eat fish."
Samwise Gamgee

@quotation block within @indentedblock

This text is within the indented block. It should be indented by a few spaces as specified by the document’s @exampleindent command if present (5 spaces by default in info output).

"Give a man a fish, and he’ll think something is rotten in Denmark, but teach a man to fish, and he’ll think you want to have sex with him."
Samwise Shakespeare

This text is within the indented block. It should be indented by a few spaces as specified by the document’s @exampleindent command if present (5 spaces by default in info output).

@indentedblock within @quotation block

"Why is the rum gone?"

"One, Because it is a vile drink that turns even the most respectable men into complete scoundrels..."

This text is within an indented block within a @quotation command. Note that we cannot follow an @author sub-command with an indented block because makeinfo always places the @author just inside the end of the @quotation block.

"But why is the rum gone?"

"... and two, because that signal is over a thousand feet high. The entire royal navy is out looking for me; do you think there is even the slightest chance they won’t see it?"

This text is within an indented block within a @quotation command. We don’t name the author of this exchange because everyone on the planet already knows who the speakers are–but it is after all, copyrighted material–so give credit where credit is due.

"There’ll be no living with her after this."
Copyright 2003, the Walt Disney Company


Deeply Nested Block Environments (stupid, but possible)

’format’ block
’display’ block
'example' block
'indentedblock' block
=='verbatim block'==
'indentedblock' block
'example' block
’display’ block
’format’ block


Bullet Characters

The character codes used by HTML for unordered lists. Note that the characters shown in the ’info’ document only approximate the characters in the HTML document which are browser-specific.

HTML NAMENESTING LEVELEXAMPLE
’disc’top( ⚫ )
’circle’second( ⚬ )
’square’third and lower( ▪ )

HTML-only output follows: default unordered lists nested to demonstrate the bullets used by default for each level.

This is embedded HTML markup:

Bullet Characters Defined in Texinfo

Texinfo character @bullet ( • )
   texi-to-HTML converter outputs ’&bull;’ U+2022
Texinfo character @textdegree ( ° )
   texi-to-HTML converter outputs ’&deg;’ U+00B0
Texinfo character @minus ( - )
   texi-to-HTML converter outputs ’-’ U+002D (which is incorrect)
   texi-to-info outputs U+2212 i.e. Unicode minus

Useful Character Codes

UNICODEEXAMPLEHTML(hex)DESCRIPTION
U+25CF( ● )&#x25CF;black-circle
U+26AB( ⚫ )&#x26AB;medium-black-circle
U+2022( • )&#x2022;medium-small-black-circle
U+2219( ∙ )&#x2219;bullet-operator (math)
U+25CB( ○ )&#x25CB;white-circle
U+26AA( ⚪ )&#x26AA;medium-white-circle
U+26AC( ⚬ )&#x26AC;medium-small-white-circle
U+25E6( ◦ )&#x25E6;white-bullet
U+25A0( ■ )&#x25A0;black-square
U+25FC( ◼ )&#x25FC;black-medium-square
U+25FE( ◾ )&#x25FE;black-medium-small-square
U+25AA( ▪ )&#x25AA;black-small-square



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Ad-hoc Tests

Write your own test sequences here

** NO AD-HOC TESTS DEFINED AT THIS TIME **






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Technical Support

Please Note: All trademarks and service marks mentioned in this
document are the entirely-too-proprietary property of their
respective owners, and this author makes no representation of
affiliation with or ownership of any of the damned things.

Contact

All source code and documentation for this project were written 
and are maintained by:

                      Mahlon R. Smith,
                   The Software Samurai
              Beijing University of Technology
              on the web at: www.SoftwareSam.us
 
For bugs, suggestions, periodic updates, or possible praise, 
please post a message to the author via website. 

By the Same Author

NcDialog APIBuild dialog-based console applications in C++
FileManglerDialog-based console file management utility
gStringText internationalization and formatting tool
SourceProfilerSource code ’maintainability’ analyzer
DvdRepairRescue data from damaged DVD video discs



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Copyright Notice

Copyright © 2014-2015  
            Mahlon R. Smith, The Software Samurai

This document describes version 0.0.07 of ’infodoc-styles.css’
and version 0.0.04 of ’idpp’.

The infodoc-styles.css CSS style definitions are released under 
the GNU General Public License (GPL 3+), and 
the user documentation (this document) is released under 
the GNU Free Documentation License (FDL 1.3+):

 Permission is granted to copy, distribute and/or modify this document
 under the terms of the GNU Free Documentation License, Version 1.3
 or any later version published by the Free Software Foundation;
 with no Invariant Sections, no Front-Cover Texts, and no Back-Cover
 Texts.  A copy of the license is available from the 
 Free Software Foundation: ‘http://www.gnu.org/licenses/



Next: , Up: Copyright Notice   [Contents][Index]

GNU General Public License

Version 3, 29 June 2007
Copyright © 2007 Free Software Foundation, Inc. http://fsf.org/

Everyone is permitted to copy and distribute verbatim copies of this
license document, but changing it is not allowed.

Preamble

The GNU General Public License is a free, copyleft license for software and other kinds of works.

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When we speak of free software, we are referring to freedom, not price. Our General Public Licenses are designed to make sure that you have the freedom to distribute copies of free software (and charge for them if you wish), that you receive source code or can get it if you want it, that you can change the software or use pieces of it in new free programs, and that you know you can do these things.

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  16. Disclaimer of Warranty.

    THERE IS NO WARRANTY FOR THE PROGRAM, TO THE EXTENT PERMITTED BY APPLICABLE LAW. EXCEPT WHEN OTHERWISE STATED IN WRITING THE COPYRIGHT HOLDERS AND/OR OTHER PARTIES PROVIDE THE PROGRAM “AS IS” WITHOUT WARRANTY OF ANY KIND, EITHER EXPRESSED OR IMPLIED, INCLUDING, BUT NOT LIMITED TO, THE IMPLIED WARRANTIES OF MERCHANTABILITY AND FITNESS FOR A PARTICULAR PURPOSE. THE ENTIRE RISK AS TO THE QUALITY AND PERFORMANCE OF THE PROGRAM IS WITH YOU. SHOULD THE PROGRAM PROVE DEFECTIVE, YOU ASSUME THE COST OF ALL NECESSARY SERVICING, REPAIR OR CORRECTION.

  17. Limitation of Liability.

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  18. Interpretation of Sections 15 and 16.

    If the disclaimer of warranty and limitation of liability provided above cannot be given local legal effect according to their terms, reviewing courts shall apply local law that most closely approximates an absolute waiver of all civil liability in connection with the Program, unless a warranty or assumption of liability accompanies a copy of the Program in return for a fee.

END OF TERMS AND CONDITIONS

How to Apply These Terms to Your New Programs

If you develop a new program, and you want it to be of the greatest possible use to the public, the best way to achieve this is to make it free software which everyone can redistribute and change under these terms.

To do so, attach the following notices to the program. It is safest to attach them to the start of each source file to most effectively state the exclusion of warranty; and each file should have at least the “copyright” line and a pointer to where the full notice is found.

one line to give the program's name and a brief idea of what it does.
Copyright (C) year name of author

This program is free software: you can redistribute it and/or modify
it under the terms of the GNU General Public License as published by
the Free Software Foundation, either version 3 of the License, or (at
your option) any later version.

This program is distributed in the hope that it will be useful, but
WITHOUT ANY WARRANTY; without even the implied warranty of
MERCHANTABILITY or FITNESS FOR A PARTICULAR PURPOSE.  See the GNU
General Public License for more details.

You should have received a copy of the GNU General Public License
along with this program.  If not, see http://www.gnu.org/licenses/.

Also add information on how to contact you by electronic and paper mail.

If the program does terminal interaction, make it output a short notice like this when it starts in an interactive mode:

program Copyright (C) year name of author
This program comes with ABSOLUTELY NO WARRANTY; for details type ‘show w’.
This is free software, and you are welcome to redistribute it
under certain conditions; type ‘show c’ for details.

The hypothetical commands ‘show w’ and ‘show c’ should show the appropriate parts of the General Public License. Of course, your program’s commands might be different; for a GUI interface, you would use an “about box”.

You should also get your employer (if you work as a programmer) or school, if any, to sign a “copyright disclaimer” for the program, if necessary. For more information on this, and how to apply and follow the GNU GPL, see http://www.gnu.org/licenses/.

The GNU General Public License does not permit incorporating your program into proprietary programs. If your program is a subroutine library, you may consider it more useful to permit linking proprietary applications with the library. If this is what you want to do, use the GNU Lesser General Public License instead of this License. But first, please read http://www.gnu.org/philosophy/why-not-lgpl.html.


Previous: , Up: Copyright Notice   [Contents][Index]

GNU Free Documentation License

Version 1.3, 3 November 2008
Copyright © 2000, 2001, 2002, 2007, 2008 Free Software Foundation, Inc.
http://fsf.org/

Everyone is permitted to copy and distribute verbatim copies
of this license document, but changing it is not allowed.
  1. PREAMBLE

    The purpose of this License is to make a manual, textbook, or other functional and useful document free in the sense of freedom: to assure everyone the effective freedom to copy and redistribute it, with or without modifying it, either commercially or noncommercially. Secondarily, this License preserves for the author and publisher a way to get credit for their work, while not being considered responsible for modifications made by others.

    This License is a kind of “copyleft”, which means that derivative works of the document must themselves be free in the same sense. It complements the GNU General Public License, which is a copyleft license designed for free software.

    We have designed this License in order to use it for manuals for free software, because free software needs free documentation: a free program should come with manuals providing the same freedoms that the software does. But this License is not limited to software manuals; it can be used for any textual work, regardless of subject matter or whether it is published as a printed book. We recommend this License principally for works whose purpose is instruction or reference.

  2. APPLICABILITY AND DEFINITIONS

    This License applies to any manual or other work, in any medium, that contains a notice placed by the copyright holder saying it can be distributed under the terms of this License. Such a notice grants a world-wide, royalty-free license, unlimited in duration, to use that work under the conditions stated herein. The “Document”, below, refers to any such manual or work. Any member of the public is a licensee, and is addressed as “you”. You accept the license if you copy, modify or distribute the work in a way requiring permission under copyright law.

    A “Modified Version” of the Document means any work containing the Document or a portion of it, either copied verbatim, or with modifications and/or translated into another language.

    A “Secondary Section” is a named appendix or a front-matter section of the Document that deals exclusively with the relationship of the publishers or authors of the Document to the Document’s overall subject (or to related matters) and contains nothing that could fall directly within that overall subject. (Thus, if the Document is in part a textbook of mathematics, a Secondary Section may not explain any mathematics.) The relationship could be a matter of historical connection with the subject or with related matters, or of legal, commercial, philosophical, ethical or political position regarding them.

    The “Invariant Sections” are certain Secondary Sections whose titles are designated, as being those of Invariant Sections, in the notice that says that the Document is released under this License. If a section does not fit the above definition of Secondary then it is not allowed to be designated as Invariant. The Document may contain zero Invariant Sections. If the Document does not identify any Invariant Sections then there are none.

    The “Cover Texts” are certain short passages of text that are listed, as Front-Cover Texts or Back-Cover Texts, in the notice that says that the Document is released under this License. A Front-Cover Text may be at most 5 words, and a Back-Cover Text may be at most 25 words.

    A “Transparent” copy of the Document means a machine-readable copy, represented in a format whose specification is available to the general public, that is suitable for revising the document straightforwardly with generic text editors or (for images composed of pixels) generic paint programs or (for drawings) some widely available drawing editor, and that is suitable for input to text formatters or for automatic translation to a variety of formats suitable for input to text formatters. A copy made in an otherwise Transparent file format whose markup, or absence of markup, has been arranged to thwart or discourage subsequent modification by readers is not Transparent. An image format is not Transparent if used for any substantial amount of text. A copy that is not “Transparent” is called “Opaque”.

    Examples of suitable formats for Transparent copies include plain ASCII without markup, Texinfo input format, LaTeX input format, SGML or XML using a publicly available DTD, and standard-conforming simple HTML, PostScript or PDF designed for human modification. Examples of transparent image formats include PNG, XCF and JPG. Opaque formats include proprietary formats that can be read and edited only by proprietary word processors, SGML or XML for which the DTD and/or processing tools are not generally available, and the machine-generated HTML, PostScript or PDF produced by some word processors for output purposes only.

    The “Title Page” means, for a printed book, the title page itself, plus such following pages as are needed to hold, legibly, the material this License requires to appear in the title page. For works in formats which do not have any title page as such, “Title Page” means the text near the most prominent appearance of the work’s title, preceding the beginning of the body of the text.

    The “publisher” means any person or entity that distributes copies of the Document to the public.

    A section “Entitled XYZ” means a named subunit of the Document whose title either is precisely XYZ or contains XYZ in parentheses following text that translates XYZ in another language. (Here XYZ stands for a specific section name mentioned below, such as “Acknowledgements”, “Dedications”, “Endorsements”, or “History”.) To “Preserve the Title” of such a section when you modify the Document means that it remains a section “Entitled XYZ” according to this definition.

    The Document may include Warranty Disclaimers next to the notice which states that this License applies to the Document. These Warranty Disclaimers are considered to be included by reference in this License, but only as regards disclaiming warranties: any other implication that these Warranty Disclaimers may have is void and has no effect on the meaning of this License.

  3. VERBATIM COPYING

    You may copy and distribute the Document in any medium, either commercially or noncommercially, provided that this License, the copyright notices, and the license notice saying this License applies to the Document are reproduced in all copies, and that you add no other conditions whatsoever to those of this License. You may not use technical measures to obstruct or control the reading or further copying of the copies you make or distribute. However, you may accept compensation in exchange for copies. If you distribute a large enough number of copies you must also follow the conditions in section 3.

    You may also lend copies, under the same conditions stated above, and you may publicly display copies.

  4. COPYING IN QUANTITY

    If you publish printed copies (or copies in media that commonly have printed covers) of the Document, numbering more than 100, and the Document’s license notice requires Cover Texts, you must enclose the copies in covers that carry, clearly and legibly, all these Cover Texts: Front-Cover Texts on the front cover, and Back-Cover Texts on the back cover. Both covers must also clearly and legibly identify you as the publisher of these copies. The front cover must present the full title with all words of the title equally prominent and visible. You may add other material on the covers in addition. Copying with changes limited to the covers, as long as they preserve the title of the Document and satisfy these conditions, can be treated as verbatim copying in other respects.

    If the required texts for either cover are too voluminous to fit legibly, you should put the first ones listed (as many as fit reasonably) on the actual cover, and continue the rest onto adjacent pages.

    If you publish or distribute Opaque copies of the Document numbering more than 100, you must either include a machine-readable Transparent copy along with each Opaque copy, or state in or with each Opaque copy a computer-network location from which the general network-using public has access to download using public-standard network protocols a complete Transparent copy of the Document, free of added material. If you use the latter option, you must take reasonably prudent steps, when you begin distribution of Opaque copies in quantity, to ensure that this Transparent copy will remain thus accessible at the stated location until at least one year after the last time you distribute an Opaque copy (directly or through your agents or retailers) of that edition to the public.

    It is requested, but not required, that you contact the authors of the Document well before redistributing any large number of copies, to give them a chance to provide you with an updated version of the Document.

  5. MODIFICATIONS

    You may copy and distribute a Modified Version of the Document under the conditions of sections 2 and 3 above, provided that you release the Modified Version under precisely this License, with the Modified Version filling the role of the Document, thus licensing distribution and modification of the Modified Version to whoever possesses a copy of it. In addition, you must do these things in the Modified Version:

    1. Use in the Title Page (and on the covers, if any) a title distinct from that of the Document, and from those of previous versions (which should, if there were any, be listed in the History section of the Document). You may use the same title as a previous version if the original publisher of that version gives permission.
    2. List on the Title Page, as authors, one or more persons or entities responsible for authorship of the modifications in the Modified Version, together with at least five of the principal authors of the Document (all of its principal authors, if it has fewer than five), unless they release you from this requirement.
    3. State on the Title page the name of the publisher of the Modified Version, as the publisher.
    4. Preserve all the copyright notices of the Document.
    5. Add an appropriate copyright notice for your modifications adjacent to the other copyright notices.
    6. Include, immediately after the copyright notices, a license notice giving the public permission to use the Modified Version under the terms of this License, in the form shown in the Addendum below.
    7. Preserve in that license notice the full lists of Invariant Sections and required Cover Texts given in the Document’s license notice.
    8. Include an unaltered copy of this License.
    9. Preserve the section Entitled “History”, Preserve its Title, and add to it an item stating at least the title, year, new authors, and publisher of the Modified Version as given on the Title Page. If there is no section Entitled “History” in the Document, create one stating the title, year, authors, and publisher of the Document as given on its Title Page, then add an item describing the Modified Version as stated in the previous sentence.
    10. Preserve the network location, if any, given in the Document for public access to a Transparent copy of the Document, and likewise the network locations given in the Document for previous versions it was based on. These may be placed in the “History” section. You may omit a network location for a work that was published at least four years before the Document itself, or if the original publisher of the version it refers to gives permission.
    11. For any section Entitled “Acknowledgements” or “Dedications”, Preserve the Title of the section, and preserve in the section all the substance and tone of each of the contributor acknowledgements and/or dedications given therein.
    12. Preserve all the Invariant Sections of the Document, unaltered in their text and in their titles. Section numbers or the equivalent are not considered part of the section titles.
    13. Delete any section Entitled “Endorsements”. Such a section may not be included in the Modified Version.
    14. Do not retitle any existing section to be Entitled “Endorsements” or to conflict in title with any Invariant Section.
    15. Preserve any Warranty Disclaimers.

    If the Modified Version includes new front-matter sections or appendices that qualify as Secondary Sections and contain no material copied from the Document, you may at your option designate some or all of these sections as invariant. To do this, add their titles to the list of Invariant Sections in the Modified Version’s license notice. These titles must be distinct from any other section titles.

    You may add a section Entitled “Endorsements”, provided it contains nothing but endorsements of your Modified Version by various parties—for example, statements of peer review or that the text has been approved by an organization as the authoritative definition of a standard.

    You may add a passage of up to five words as a Front-Cover Text, and a passage of up to 25 words as a Back-Cover Text, to the end of the list of Cover Texts in the Modified Version. Only one passage of Front-Cover Text and one of Back-Cover Text may be added by (or through arrangements made by) any one entity. If the Document already includes a cover text for the same cover, previously added by you or by arrangement made by the same entity you are acting on behalf of, you may not add another; but you may replace the old one, on explicit permission from the previous publisher that added the old one.

    The author(s) and publisher(s) of the Document do not by this License give permission to use their names for publicity for or to assert or imply endorsement of any Modified Version.

  6. COMBINING DOCUMENTS

    You may combine the Document with other documents released under this License, under the terms defined in section 4 above for modified versions, provided that you include in the combination all of the Invariant Sections of all of the original documents, unmodified, and list them all as Invariant Sections of your combined work in its license notice, and that you preserve all their Warranty Disclaimers.

    The combined work need only contain one copy of this License, and multiple identical Invariant Sections may be replaced with a single copy. If there are multiple Invariant Sections with the same name but different contents, make the title of each such section unique by adding at the end of it, in parentheses, the name of the original author or publisher of that section if known, or else a unique number. Make the same adjustment to the section titles in the list of Invariant Sections in the license notice of the combined work.

    In the combination, you must combine any sections Entitled “History” in the various original documents, forming one section Entitled “History”; likewise combine any sections Entitled “Acknowledgements”, and any sections Entitled “Dedications”. You must delete all sections Entitled “Endorsements.”

  7. COLLECTIONS OF DOCUMENTS

    You may make a collection consisting of the Document and other documents released under this License, and replace the individual copies of this License in the various documents with a single copy that is included in the collection, provided that you follow the rules of this License for verbatim copying of each of the documents in all other respects.

    You may extract a single document from such a collection, and distribute it individually under this License, provided you insert a copy of this License into the extracted document, and follow this License in all other respects regarding verbatim copying of that document.

  8. AGGREGATION WITH INDEPENDENT WORKS

    A compilation of the Document or its derivatives with other separate and independent documents or works, in or on a volume of a storage or distribution medium, is called an “aggregate” if the copyright resulting from the compilation is not used to limit the legal rights of the compilation’s users beyond what the individual works permit. When the Document is included in an aggregate, this License does not apply to the other works in the aggregate which are not themselves derivative works of the Document.

    If the Cover Text requirement of section 3 is applicable to these copies of the Document, then if the Document is less than one half of the entire aggregate, the Document’s Cover Texts may be placed on covers that bracket the Document within the aggregate, or the electronic equivalent of covers if the Document is in electronic form. Otherwise they must appear on printed covers that bracket the whole aggregate.

  9. TRANSLATION

    Translation is considered a kind of modification, so you may distribute translations of the Document under the terms of section 4. Replacing Invariant Sections with translations requires special permission from their copyright holders, but you may include translations of some or all Invariant Sections in addition to the original versions of these Invariant Sections. You may include a translation of this License, and all the license notices in the Document, and any Warranty Disclaimers, provided that you also include the original English version of this License and the original versions of those notices and disclaimers. In case of a disagreement between the translation and the original version of this License or a notice or disclaimer, the original version will prevail.

    If a section in the Document is Entitled “Acknowledgements”, “Dedications”, or “History”, the requirement (section 4) to Preserve its Title (section 1) will typically require changing the actual title.

  10. TERMINATION

    You may not copy, modify, sublicense, or distribute the Document except as expressly provided under this License. Any attempt otherwise to copy, modify, sublicense, or distribute it is void, and will automatically terminate your rights under this License.

    However, if you cease all violation of this License, then your license from a particular copyright holder is reinstated (a) provisionally, unless and until the copyright holder explicitly and finally terminates your license, and (b) permanently, if the copyright holder fails to notify you of the violation by some reasonable means prior to 60 days after the cessation.

    Moreover, your license from a particular copyright holder is reinstated permanently if the copyright holder notifies you of the violation by some reasonable means, this is the first time you have received notice of violation of this License (for any work) from that copyright holder, and you cure the violation prior to 30 days after your receipt of the notice.

    Termination of your rights under this section does not terminate the licenses of parties who have received copies or rights from you under this License. If your rights have been terminated and not permanently reinstated, receipt of a copy of some or all of the same material does not give you any rights to use it.

  11. FUTURE REVISIONS OF THIS LICENSE

    The Free Software Foundation may publish new, revised versions of the GNU Free Documentation License from time to time. Such new versions will be similar in spirit to the present version, but may differ in detail to address new problems or concerns. See http://www.gnu.org/copyleft/.

    Each version of the License is given a distinguishing version number. If the Document specifies that a particular numbered version of this License “or any later version” applies to it, you have the option of following the terms and conditions either of that specified version or of any later version that has been published (not as a draft) by the Free Software Foundation. If the Document does not specify a version number of this License, you may choose any version ever published (not as a draft) by the Free Software Foundation. If the Document specifies that a proxy can decide which future versions of this License can be used, that proxy’s public statement of acceptance of a version permanently authorizes you to choose that version for the Document.

  12. RELICENSING

    “Massive Multiauthor Collaboration Site” (or “MMC Site”) means any World Wide Web server that publishes copyrightable works and also provides prominent facilities for anybody to edit those works. A public wiki that anybody can edit is an example of such a server. A “Massive Multiauthor Collaboration” (or “MMC”) contained in the site means any set of copyrightable works thus published on the MMC site.

    “CC-BY-SA” means the Creative Commons Attribution-Share Alike 3.0 license published by Creative Commons Corporation, a not-for-profit corporation with a principal place of business in San Francisco, California, as well as future copyleft versions of that license published by that same organization.

    “Incorporate” means to publish or republish a Document, in whole or in part, as part of another Document.

    An MMC is “eligible for relicensing” if it is licensed under this License, and if all works that were first published under this License somewhere other than this MMC, and subsequently incorporated in whole or in part into the MMC, (1) had no cover texts or invariant sections, and (2) were thus incorporated prior to November 1, 2008.

    The operator of an MMC Site may republish an MMC contained in the site under CC-BY-SA on the same site at any time before August 1, 2009, provided the MMC is eligible for relicensing.

ADDENDUM: How to use this License for your documents

To use this License in a document you have written, include a copy of the License in the document and put the following copyright and license notices just after the title page:

  Copyright (C)  year  your name.
  Permission is granted to copy, distribute and/or modify this document
  under the terms of the GNU Free Documentation License, Version 1.3
  or any later version published by the Free Software Foundation;
  with no Invariant Sections, no Front-Cover Texts, and no Back-Cover
  Texts.  A copy of the license is included in the section entitled ``GNU
  Free Documentation License''.

If you have Invariant Sections, Front-Cover Texts and Back-Cover Texts, replace the “with…Texts.” line with this:

    with the Invariant Sections being list their titles, with
    the Front-Cover Texts being list, and with the Back-Cover Texts
    being list.

If you have Invariant Sections without Cover Texts, or some other combination of the three, merge those two alternatives to suit the situation.

If your document contains nontrivial examples of program code, we recommend releasing these examples in parallel under your choice of free software license, such as the GNU General Public License, to permit their use in free software.




Previous: , Up: Top   [Contents][Index]

Index

Jump to:   0  
A   B   C   D   E   F   G   H   I   L   M   N   O   P   Q   R   S   T   U   V  
Index Entry  Section

0
01 Overview: Overview
02 CSS Definition File: CSS Definition File
02.01 Summary of CSS Definitions: Summary of CSS Definitions
02.02 Applying the CSS Definitions: Applying the CSS Definitions
02.03 Adjusting Style Definitions: Adjusting Style Definitions
03 HTML Post-processing: HTML Post-processing
03.01 Infodoc Post-processor: Infodoc Post-processor
03.01.01 Post-processor Overview: Post-processor Overview
03.01.02 Text Mode: Text Mode
03.01.03 Interactive Mode: Interactive Mode
03.01.04 Invoking idpp: Invoking idpp
03.01.05 Interface Logic: Interface Logic
03.01.06 Build idpp from source: Build idpp from source
03.02 Manual Post-processing: Manual Post-processing
03.02.01 Basic Manual Processing: Basic Manual Processing
03.02.02 Manual List Processing: Manual List Processing
03.02.03 Other Manual Processing: Other Manual Processing
03.02.04 Texinfo HTML Options: Texinfo HTML Options
03.02.04a Embedded HTML Code: Embedded HTML Code
03.02.04b Texinfo Build Options: Texinfo Build Options
03.02.04c Including Entire CSS File: Including Entire CSS File
03.02.05 Post-processing Notes: Post-processing Notes
04 Makeinfo Testing: Makeinfo Testing
04.01 Testing Overview: Testing Overview
04.02 Default Style Set: Default Style Set
04.03 Basic Tests: Basic Tests
04.04 List Commands: List Commands
04.04.01 Itemized Lists: Itemized Lists
04.04.02 Enumerated Lists: Enumerated Lists
04.05 Block Commands: Block Commands
04.05.01 Quotation Commands: Quotation Commands
04.05.02 Indentedblock Commands: Indentedblock Commands
04.05.03 Example Commands: Example Commands
04.05.04 Display Commands: Display Commands
04.05.05 Format Commands: Format Commands
04.05.06 Verbatim Command: Verbatim Command
04.05.07 Misc Block Modifiers: Misc Block Modifiers
04.05.08 Comparison Chart: Comparison Chart
04.06 Table and Multitable: Table and Multitable
04.07 Font Modification: Font Modification
04.08 Object Indicators: Object Indicators
04.09 InfoMenu Structure: InfoMenu Structure
04.10 InfoTOC Structure: InfoTOC Structure
04.11 Misc Formatting: Misc Formatting
05 Idpp Testing: Idpp Testing
05.01 Idpp List Processing: Idpp List Processing
05.02 Idpp Block Processing: Idpp Block Processing
05.03 Idpp Misc Tests: Idpp Misc Tests
05.04 Ad-hoc Tests: Ad-hoc Tests
06 Technical Support: Technical Support
07 Copyright Notice: Copyright Notice
07.01 GNU General Public License: GNU General Public License
07.02 GNU Free Documentation License: GNU Free Documentation License

A
adjust style definitions: Adjusting Style Definitions
apply CSS to HTML document: Applying the CSS Definitions
arguments, idpp command line: Invoking idpp
auto-generated styles: Default Style Set
automatic post-processing: Infodoc Post-processor

B
basic post-processing: Basic Manual Processing
basic tests, makeinfo: Basic Tests
block command comparison chart: Comparison Chart
block environments: Block Commands
block modifiers: Misc Block Modifiers
body text: Basic Tests
browsers, testing done with: CSS Definition File

C
character type and style: Font Modification
commands for data blocks: Block Commands
comparison chart for block commands: Comparison Chart
contact info: Technical Support
contact information: Technical Support

D
date_in_header: Texinfo Build Options
default HTML styles: Default Style Set
display command: Display Commands

E
enumerate command, texinfo: Enumerated Lists
environments, blocks: Block Commands
example command: Example Commands

F
font, modifying: Font Modification
format command: Format Commands

G
global document commands, Texinfo: Texinfo HTML Options

H
headings: Basic Tests
HTML automatic post-processor: Infodoc Post-processor
HTML customization variables: Texinfo HTML Options

I
idpp command line arguments: Invoking idpp
include CSS in texi source: Including Entire CSS File
indentedblock command: Indentedblock Commands
indicators, object-type: Object Indicators
introduction to Infodoc: Overview
invoking idpp: Invoking idpp
itemize command, texinfo: Itemized Lists

L
lisp command: Example Commands
lists, ordered and unordered: List Commands
lists, post-processing of: Basic Manual Processing
lists, post-processing of: Manual List Processing
logic, interface: Interface Logic

M
main menu: Top
makeinfo basic tests: Basic Tests
makeinfo tables: Table and Multitable
manual post-processing: Manual Post-processing
menus, Texinfo: InfoMenu Structure
miscellaneous makeinfo tests: Misc Formatting
miscellaneous tests: Misc Formatting
modifying font: Font Modification
multitable command: Table and Multitable

N
nuclear annihilation: Adjusting Style Definitions

O
object-type indicator: Object Indicators
ol lists: Enumerated Lists
operational overview: Overview
optional post-processing: Other Manual Processing
ordered lists: Enumerated Lists
other projects: Technical Support
overview: Overview
overview of CSS definitions: Summary of CSS Definitions
overview of testing: Testing Overview

P
panic button: Invoking idpp
paragraph text: Basic Tests
post-processing of lists: Manual List Processing
post-processing, basic: Basic Manual Processing
post-processing, optional: Other Manual Processing

Q
quotation command: Quotation Commands

R
raw HTML output: Post-processing Notes
response file: Interface Logic

S
smalldisplay command: Display Commands
smallexample command: Example Commands
smallformat command: Format Commands
smallindentedblock command: Indentedblock Commands
smalllisp command: Example Commands
smallquotation command: Quotation Commands
smallverbatim command: Verbatim Command
style definitions, adjusting: Adjusting Style Definitions
style stubs: Default Style Set
support: Technical Support
switches, idpp command line: Invoking idpp

T
table of contents, Texinfo: InfoTOC Structure
tables, makeinfo: Table and Multitable
Technical Support: Technical Support
testing, basic makeinfo: Basic Tests
testing, overview of: Testing Overview
texi-to-HTML converter: Post-processing Notes
texinfo enumerate command: Enumerated Lists
Texinfo global document commands: Texinfo HTML Options
texinfo itemize command: Itemized Lists
Texinfo menus: InfoMenu Structure
Texinfo table of contents: InfoTOC Structure
translate menus to HTML: InfoMenu Structure
translate TOC to HTML: InfoTOC Structure

U
ul lists: Itemized Lists
unordered lists: Itemized Lists

V
variables, HTML customization: Texinfo HTML Options
verbatim command: Verbatim Command

Jump to:   0  
A   B   C   D   E   F   G   H   I   L   M   N   O   P   Q   R   S   T   U   V  



Notes on Index Formatting

The generated index looks really good in HTML without any modification
at all. There are only two things we do to style the Index:
 1) We define the 'a.summary-letter' class just as it is defined in 
    the raw HTML output. (This prevents the summary letters from being 
    underlined.)
 2) We define the 'table.index-cp' class which is called out in the 
    auto-generated Index but never defined. This definition really 
    isn't necessary because the existing table definition works fine. 
    We define 'index-cp' anyway because in our experience, things that 
    work correctly by coincidence will eventually return to leave 
    toothmarks on your fanny.

 There is, however, one small artifact in the index which is caused 
 by our redefinition of the HTML <table> element to support the 
 @multitable command (see Multitable Command).
 Our definition causes the <th> (table header) element to be underlined. 
 This in turn causes the <th></th> rows of the 'Jump to' tables in the 
 index to be underlined as well. This is very minor, but it is handled 
 automatically by the 'idpp' automatic post-processor. 
 Please refer to see Post-processor Overview for details.